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Photonic Crystals at Near-Infrared and Optical Wavelengths

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011


Alexander Moroz
Affiliation:
Debye Institute, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands http://www.amolf.nl//research/photonic_materials_theory/moroz/moroz.html

Abstract

As demonstrated for the example of a diamond and zinc blende structure of dielectric spheres, small inclusions of a low absorbing metal with the volume fraction fm can have a dramatic effect on a complete photonic band gap (CPBG) between the 2nd-3rd bands. For example, in the case of silica coated silver spheres, the CPBG opens for fm ≍ 1.1% and exceeds 5% for fm ≍ 2.5%. Consequently, any dielectric material can be used to fabricate a photonic crystal with a sizeable and robust CPBG in three dimensions. Absorption in the CPBG of 5% remains very small (≥ 2.6% for λ ≥ 750 nm). The structure enjoys almost perfect scaling, enabling one to scale the CPBG from microwaves down to ultraviolet wavelengths.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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