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Real-Time Timbral Organisation: Selecting samples based upon similarity1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

Arne Eigenfeldt*
Affiliation:
School for the Contemporary Arts/, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
Philippe Pasquier*
Affiliation:
School of Interactive Arts and Technology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada

Abstract

A comparison is made between two systems of real-time sample selection using timbral proximity that has relevance for live performance. Sound files in large sample libraries are analysed for audio features (amplitude RMS, spectral centroid, spectral flatness, and spectral energy using a Bark auditory modeller), and this data is statistically analysed and stored. Two methods of organisation are described: the first uses fuzzy logic to rate sample similarity, the second uses a self-organising map. The benefits and detriments of each method are described.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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Footnotes

1

This research was funded by a grant from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

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