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How can local and traditional knowledge be effectively incorporated into international assessments?

  • William J. Sutherland (a1), Toby A. Gardner (a1), L. Jamila Haider (a2) and Lynn V. Dicks (a1)
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References
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Amano T. & Sutherland W.J. (2013) Four barriers to the global understanding of biodiversity conservation: wealth, language, geographical location and security. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 280, 20122649.
Biggs D., Abel N., Knight A.T., Leitch A., Langston A. & Ban N. (2011) The implementation crisis in conservation planning: could ‘mental models’ help? Conservation Letters, 4, 169183.
Dicks L.V., Hodge I., Randall N., Scharlemann J.P.W., Siriwardena G.M., Smith H.G. et al. (2013) A transparent process for ‘evidence-informed’ policy making. Conservation Letters, doi 10.1111/conl.12046
Dicks L.J., Showler D.A. & Sutherland W.J. (2010) Bee Conservation: Evidence for the Effectiveness of Interventions. Pelagic Publishing, Exeter, UK.
Fazey I., Fazey J.A., Salisbury J.G., Lindenmayer D.B. & Dovers S. (2006) The nature and role of experiential knowledge for environmental conservation. Environmental Conservation, 33, 110.
Gagnon C. A. & Berteaux. D. (2009) Integrating traditional ecological knowledge and ecological science: a question of scale. Ecology and Society, 14, 19.
Graham R., Mancher M., Wolman D.M., Greenfield S. & Steinberg E. (eds) (2011) Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. National Academic Press, Washington, DC, USA.
Leite M.C.F. & Gasalla M.A. (2013) A method for assessing fishers' ecological knowledge as a practical tool for ecosystem-based fisheries management: seeking consensus in Southeastern Brazil. Fisheries Research, 145, 4353.
Raymond C.M., Fazey I., Reed M.S., Stringer L.C., Robinson G.M. & Evely A.C. (2010) Integrating local and scientific knowledge for environmental management. Journal of Environmental Management, 91, 17661777.
Sutherland W.J. (2013) Review by quality not quantity for better policy. Nature, 503, 167.
Tengö M., Malmer P., Brondizio E., Elmqvist T. & Spierenburg M. (2013) The Multiple Evidence Base as a Framework for Connecting Diverse Knowledge Systems in the IPBES. Discussion paper 2012004. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Thaman R., Lyver P., Mpande R., Perez E., Cariño J. & Takeuchi K. (eds) (2013) The Contribution of Indigenous and Local Knowledge Systems to IPBES: Building Synergies with Science. IPBES Expert Meeting Report, UNESCO/UNU. UNESCO, Paris, France.
Turnhout E., Bloomfield B., Hulme M., Vogel J. & Wynne B. (2012) Listen to the voices of experience. Nature, 488, 454455.
Van Oudenhoven F.J.W. & Haider L.J. (2012) Imagining alternative futures through the lens of food: the Afghan and Tajik Pamir Mountains. La Revue d'Ethnoecologie, 2, doi 10.4000/ethnoecologie.970
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Oryx
  • ISSN: 0030-6053
  • EISSN: 1365-3008
  • URL: /core/journals/oryx
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