Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-zdfhw Total loading time: 0.331 Render date: 2022-08-17T01:11:35.890Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

American Politics and Political Science in an Era of Growing Racial Diversity and Economic Disparity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2016

Abstract

Political science should play a larger role in grappling with the political roots, meanings, and implications of the various levels and unique configurations of class inequality and racial diversity that have characterized the last several decades of U.S. history. I offer some observations about the discipline’s research, or lack thereof, and indicate suggestions about how we might think about and do more in these respects.

I will come at these concerns by noting some developments that influenced the present in social and political terms and other events in political science; identifying intellectual guideposts that may help how we think about research issues of our day; considering why race and class are not studied (more); acknowledging how the questions have been studied, as well as noting some reservations about these; and providing several examples from the research in which I have been involved, both directly and indirectly, that suggest how we might or can study these questions.

Type
Presidential Address
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Banting, Keith and Kymlicka, Will. 2006. “Multiculturalism and the Welfare State: Setting the Context.” In Multiculturalism and the Welfare State: Recognition and Redistribution in Contemporary Democracies, ed. Banting, Keith and Kymlicka., Will, Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Banting, Keith and Thompson, Debra. 2015 “The Puzzling Persistence of Racial Inequality in Canada.” Paper for Task Force on “Racial and Class Inequalities in the Americas.” Washington, DC: American Political Science Association.Google Scholar
Barker, Lucius J. 1994. “Limits of Political Strategy: A Systemic View of the African American Experience.” Presidential Address, to the American Political Science Association, 1993. American Political Science Review 88(1): 113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Branton, Regina P. and Jones, Bradford S.. 2005. “Reexamining Racial Attitudes: The Conditional Relationship between Diversity and Socioeconomic Environment.” American Journal of Political Science 49(2): 359–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carmines, Edward G. and Stimson, James A.. 1989. Race and the Transformation of American Politics. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Dahl, Robert A. 1961. Who Governs? Democracy and Power in an American City. New Haven: Yale University Press Google Scholar
Dahl, Robert A. 1977. “On Removing Certain Impediments to Democracy in the United States.” Political Science Quarterly 92(1): 120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fox, Cybelle. 2012. Three Worlds of Relief: Race, Immigration, and the AmericanWelfare State from the Progressive Era to the New Deal. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Gilens, Martin. 1999. Why Americans Hate Welfare: Race, Media and the Politics of Antipoverty Policy. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gilens, Martin. 2003. “How the Poor Became Black.” In Race and the Politics of Welfare Reform, ed. Schram, Sanford F., Soss, Joe and Fording, Richard C., [city]: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
Gilens, Martin and Page, Benjamin I.. 2014. “Testing Theories of American Politics: Elites, Interest Groups, and Average Citizens” Perspectives on Politics 12(3): 564–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Glazer, Nathan and Moynihan, Daniel P.. 1963. Beyond the Melting Pot: The Negroes, Puerto Rican, Jews, Italians, and Irish of New York City. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Hajnal, Zoltan and Trounstine, Jessica. 2015. “Race and Class Inequality in Local Politics” Paper for Task Force on “Racial and Class Inequalities in the Americas.” Washington, DC: American Political Science Association.Google Scholar
Hero, Rodney E. 1992. Latinos and the U.S. Political System: Two-tiered Pluralism Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
Hero, Rodney E. 1998. Faces of Inequality: Social Diversity in American Politics. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Hero, Rodney E. 2007. Racial Diversity and Social Capital: Equality and Community in America. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hero, Rodney E. and Levy, Morris. 2015. “The Racial Structure of Inequality and Redistribution in the U.S. States.” Unpublished manuscript.
Katzenstein, Peter J. 2010. “‘Walls’ between ‘Those People’: Contrasting Perspectives on World Politics.” (Presidential Address to the American Political Science Association, 2009.) Perspectives on Politics 8(1): 1125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Katznelson, Ira. 2005. When Affirmative Action was White: An Untold History of Racial Inequality in America. New York, NY: W.W. Norton.Google Scholar
Levi, Margaret. 2006. “Why We Need a New Theory of Government.” (Presidential Address to the American Political Science Association, 2005.) Perspectives on Politics 4(1): 119.Google Scholar
Lieberman, Robert C. 1998. Shifting the Color Line: Race and the American Welfare State. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Lindblom, Charles. 1982. “Another State of Mind.” Presidential Address to the American Political Science Association, 1981. American Political Science Review 76(1): 921.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lowi, Theodore J. 1992. “The State in Political Science: How We Become What We Study.” (Presidential Address to the American Political Science Association, 1991.) American Political Science Review 86(1): 17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Madison, James. [1788]. Federalist No. 10.
Mansbridge, Jane. 2014. “What Is Political Science For?” (Presidential Address to the American Political Science Association, 2013.) Perspectives on Politics 12(1): 817.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meier, Kenneth and Stewart, Joseph Jr. 1991. The Politics of Hispanic Education. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Meier, Kenneth, Stewart, Joseph Jr., and England, Robert. 1989. Race, Class and Education: The Politics of Second Generation Discrimination. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
Mettler, Suzanne. 2008. “Suzanne Mettler: Reply to Ira Katznelson.” In “On Race and Policy History: A Dialogue about the G.I. Bill.” Perspectives on Politics 6(3): 519–37.Google Scholar
Monroe, Kristen Renwick, ed. 2005. Perestroika! The Raucous Rebellion in Political Science. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Obama, Barak. Presidential State of the Union Address [to the U.S. Congress]. January 20, 2015. (Washington, DC).
Penner, Andrew M. and Saperstein, Aliya. 2013. “Engendering Racial Perceptions: An Intersectional Analysis of How Social Status Shapes Race.” Gender & Society 27(3): 319–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pierson, Paul. 2015. “Race, Partisanship, and the Rise of Income Inequality in the United States.” Paper for Task Force on “Racial and Class Inequalities in the Americas.” Washington, D.C.: American Political Science Association.Google Scholar
Pinderhughes, Dianne. 2009. “The Challenge of Democracy: Explorations in American Racial Politics.” Presidential Address to the American Political Science Association, 2008. Perspectives on Politics 7(1): 311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Putnam, Robert D. 2003. “APSA Presidential Address: The Public Role of Political Science.” Perspectives on Politics 1(2): 249–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmidt, Ronald Sr., Aoki, Andrew, Alex-Assensoh, Yvette, and Hero, Rodney E.. 2002. “Political Science—The New Immigration and Racial Politics in the United States: What Do We Know? What Do We Need to Know?” Presented at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, August 29–September 1, Boston, MA.
Schneider, Anne and Ingram, Helen. 1993. “Social Construction of Target Populations: Implications for Politics and Policy.” American Political Science Review 87(2): 334–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scott, Joanna Vecchiarelli. 2005. “Ironic Representation.” In Perestroika! The Raucous Rebellion in Political Science, ed. Monroe, Kristen Renwick. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Soss, Joe, Fording, Richard C., and Schram, Sanford S. 2011. Disciplining the Poor: Neoliberal Paternalism and the Persistent Power of Race. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, Rogers M. 1993. “Beyond Tocqueville, Myrdal, and Hartz: The Multiple Traditions in America.” American Political Science Review 87(3): 549–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stille, Alexander. 2011. “The Paradox of the New Elite.” New York Times, Sunday Review. October 23, 1.Google Scholar
Trejo, Guillermo and Altamirano, Melina. 2015. “Race and Redistribution in Latin America: Why Societies Discriminate against Individuals with Indigenous Phenotypical Features.” Paper for Task Force on “Racial and Class Inequalities in the Americas.” Washington, D.C.: American Political Science Association.Google Scholar
Warren, Dorian T. 2005. “Will the Real Perestroikans Please Stand Up? Race and Methodological Reform in the Study of Politics.” In Perestroika! The Raucous Rebellion in Political Science, ed. Monroe, Kristen Renwick. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Wolfinger, Raymond E. 1974. The Politics of Progress. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
2
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

American Politics and Political Science in an Era of Growing Racial Diversity and Economic Disparity
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

American Politics and Political Science in an Era of Growing Racial Diversity and Economic Disparity
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

American Politics and Political Science in an Era of Growing Racial Diversity and Economic Disparity
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *