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How Can We Make Political Science Less Techno-Centric? Widen Rather than Narrow its Distance from the Government

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2015

Abstract

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Reflections Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2015 

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References

Oren, Ido. 2000. “Is Culture Independent of National Security? How America’s National Security Concerns Shaped ‘Political Culture’ Research.” European Journal of International Relations 6(4): 543–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oren, Ido. 2003. Our Enemies and US: America’s Rivalries and the Making of Political Science. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Oren, Ido. 2014. “A Sociological Analysis of the Decline of American IR Theory.” Presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Toronto, March 26–29.
Robin, Ron T. 2001. The Making of the Cold War Enemy: Culture and Politics in the Military-Intellectual Complex. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Rohde, Joy. 2013. Armed with Expertise: The Militarization of American Social Research during the Cold War. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Schrodt, Philip A. 1995. “Event Data in Foreign Policy Analysis.” In Foreign Policy Analysis: Continuity and Change in Its Second Generation, ed. Neack, Laura, Hey, Jeanne A. K., and Haney, Patrick J.. New York: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Schrodt, Philip A. 2012. “Precedents, Progress, and Prospects in Political Event Data.” International Interactions 38(4): 546–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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How Can We Make Political Science Less Techno-Centric? Widen Rather than Narrow its Distance from the Government
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