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High-yielding winter synthetic hexaploid wheats resistant to multiple diseases and pests

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2017


Alexey Morgounov
Affiliation:
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek, 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Aygul Abugalieva
Affiliation:
Kazakh Research Institute of Crops and Farming, Almalybak, Almaty 483133, Kazakhstan
Kadir Akan
Affiliation:
Central Field Crop Research Institute, Yenimahalle, 06170 Ankara, Turkey
Beyhan Akın
Affiliation:
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek, 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Stephen Baenziger
Affiliation:
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA
Madhav Bhatta
Affiliation:
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA
Abdelfattah A. Dababat
Affiliation:
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek, 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Lütfü Demir
Affiliation:
Maize Research Institute, Arifiye, Sakarya, Turkey
Yerlan Dutbayev
Affiliation:
Kazakh National Agrarian University, Almaty 050000, Kazakhstan
Moustapha El Bouhssini
Affiliation:
International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Rabat, Morocco
Gül Erginbaş-Orakci
Affiliation:
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek, 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Masahiro Kishii
Affiliation:
CIMMYT, Apdo. Postal 6-641, 06600 Mexico D.F., Mexico
Mesut Keser
Affiliation:
ICARDA, P.K. 39 Emek, 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Emrah Koç
Affiliation:
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek, 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Altynbek Kurespek
Affiliation:
Kazakh National Agrarian University, Almaty 050000, Kazakhstan
Abdul Mujeeb-Kazi
Affiliation:
Texas A&M University, Texas, USA
Aysel Yorgancılar
Affiliation:
Transitional Zone Agricultural Research Institute, Eskisehir, Turkey
Fatih Özdemir
Affiliation:
Bahri Dagdas International Agricultural Research Institute, Konya, Turkey
Ibrahim Özturk
Affiliation:
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek, 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Thomas Payne
Affiliation:
CIMMYT, Apdo. Postal 6-641, 06600 Mexico D.F., Mexico
Gular Qadimaliyeva
Affiliation:
Genetic Resources Institute, Baku AZ1106, Azerbaijan
Vladimir Shamanin
Affiliation:
Omsk State Agricultural University, Omsk 644008, Russia
Kemal Subasi
Affiliation:
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek, 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Gulnura Suleymanova
Affiliation:
Kazakh National Agrarian University, Almaty 050000, Kazakhstan
Enes Yakişir
Affiliation:
Bahri Dagdas International Agricultural Research Institute, Konya, Turkey
Yuriy Zelenskiy
Affiliation:
CIMMYT, Astana 010000, Kazakhstan
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Development of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) synthetics started at CIMMYT-Mexico in 2004, when winter durum wheat (Triticum turgidum) germplasm from Ukraine and Romania was crossed with Aegilops tauschii accessions from the Caspian Sea region. Chromosomes were doubled after pollination and embryo rescue, but chromosome number and cytological validation was not performed. F2 populations were grown in Mexico and were shipped to Turkey in 2008. During 2009–2015, these populations were subjected to rigorous pedigree selection under dry, cold, disease-affected environments of the Central Anatolian Plateau. The wide segregation and partial sterility observed in 2009 gradually decreased and, by 2016, most of the F8 single spike progenies demonstrated good fertility and agronomic performance. Since 2013, lines have been selected from synthetic populations and evaluated at multiple sites. Superior lines were characterized for resistance to leaf, stripe and stem rust, plant height, and reaction to common bunt and soil-borne pathogens. Thousand kernel weight of many lines exceeded 50 g, compared with the check varieties that barely reached 40 g. Threshability of synthetic lines varied from 0 to 95%, demonstrating genetic variation for this important domestication trait. Screening against Hessian fly, sunny pest and Russian wheat aphid identified several resistant genotypes. Both durum and Aegilops parents affected synthetic wheat traits. Several studies are underway to reveal the genetic diversity of synthetic lines and the basis of resistance to diseases and insects. This synthetic germplasm represents a new winter bread wheat parental pool. It is available upon request to interested breeding/research programmes.


Type
Short Communication
Copyright
Copyright © NIAB 2017 

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References

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