Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-8hm5d Total loading time: 0.298 Render date: 2022-05-19T21:50:45.653Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Article contents

Identification and assessment of contaminated sites at Casey Station, Wilkes Land, Antarctica

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 October 2009

Patrick P. Deprez
Affiliation:
Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, GPO Box 44A, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
Michael Arens
Affiliation:
Australian Antarctic Division, Commonwealth Department of the Environment and Heritage, Channel Highway, Kingston, Tasmania 7050, Australia
Helen Locher
Affiliation:
Hydro Electric Corporation, GPO Box 355D, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

Abstract

In December 1993 a study of contaminated sites at Casey Station, Wilkes Land, Antarctica, was undertaken. The preliminary assessment of these contaminated sites is presented here. A register of contaminated sites for Casey Station was developed, based on a survey of past Antarctic expeditioners, relevant literature, and in-house reports relating to site usage and history. On this basis a sampling strategy was devised for the highest priority, potentially contaminated sites at Casey Station. Samples were collected from the refuse disposal site (tip site) at Thala Valley and the mechanical workshop/powerhouse areas of ‘Old’ Casey. The results indicated that copper, lead, and zinc were leaching from the tip site into adjacent Brown Bay, with ‘hot spots’ of high petroleum hydrocarbon levels. The mechanical workshop/powerhouse area was also shown to be contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and metals such as copper, lead, and zinc. Several recommendations were made, including the removal of rubbish mixed with soil at the bottom end of Thala Valley in such a manner as to prevent any further release of contaminants, with subsequent site monitoring to verify effective removal of contaminants to acceptable environmental levels. It was also recommended that further investigations be carried out on the ecosystem of Brown Bay, the large fuel spill site, the upper and lower fuel-storage areas, and the area around the incinerator. There is scope for monitoring the natural breakdown and migration of contaminants at the mechanical workshop/powerhouse site. This should include studies on bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Mechanisms for arresting surface migration should be investigated in those sites identified. In addition to meeting some of the international obligations of the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, this work also contributes towards the development of an approach to assessment and management of contaminated sites that is uniquely adapted to the Antarctic environment and could be applied at other Antarctic stations. to the assessment and management of contaminated sites that is uniquely adapted to the Antarctic environment. This approach could be utilised for site assessments at other Antarctic stations.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1999

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Adamson, E., and Seppelt, R.D.. 1990. A comparison of airborne alkaline pollution damage in selected lichens and mosses at Casey Station, Wilkes Land, Antarctica. In: Kerry, K.R., and Hempel, G. (editors). Antarctic ecosystems: ecological change and conservation. Berlin and New York: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
ANARE News. 1990. Midwinter fuel spill contained. ANARE News Winter: 13.Google Scholar
ANARE News. 1993. Reconstructing our Antarctic stations – the end in site. ANARE News Winter: 2122.Google Scholar
ANZECC. 1992. Australian water quality guidelines for fresh and marine waters. Canberra: Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council.Google Scholar
ANZECC/NH&MRC. 1992. Australian and New Zealand guidelines for the assessment and management of contaminated sites. Melbourne: Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council/National Health and Medical Research Council.Google Scholar
ASAC. 1991. Antarctic research priorities for the 1990s: a review. Canberra: Antarctic Science Advisory Committee, Department of the Arts, Sport, the Environment, Tourism and Territories.Google Scholar
Benninghof, W.S., and Bonner, W.N.. 1985. Man's impact on the Antarctic environment: a procedure for evaluating impacts from scientific and logistic activities. Cambridge: Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research.Google Scholar
Blight, D.F., and Oliver, R.L. 1977. The metamorphic geology of the Windmill Islands, Antarctica: a preliminary account. Journal of the Geological Society of Australia 24 (5): 239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bonner, W.N. 1984. Conservation and the Antarctic. In: Laws, R.M. (editor). Antarctic ecology. 2 vols. San Diego: Academic Press: II, 821850.Google Scholar
Bonner, W.N. 1988. Environmental assessment in the Antarctic. Ambio 18 (1): 8389.Google Scholar
Canale, G., Fulford, B., and Quilligan, H.L.. 1990. Waste minimisation at Casey Station, Australian Antarctic Territory. Melbourne: Graduate School of Environmental Science, Monash University.Google Scholar
Canning, E.A., and Goldsworthy, P.. 1997. Preliminary site contamination report. Kingston, Tasmania: Astralian Antarctic Division.Google Scholar
Department of Environment and Planning. 1992. Contaminated sites: their identification, assessment, management and remediation in Tasmania: a discussion paper. Hobart: Department of Environment and Planning.Google Scholar
Gambrell, R.P., and Patrick, W.H. Jr 1991. Physical/chemical characteristics of soils. In: EPA contaminated sites seminar: speaker slides. Cincinnati: US Environment Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development: 2.12.9.Google Scholar
Green, G., Skerratt, J.H., Leeming, R., and Nichols, P.D.. 1992. Hydrocarbon and coprostanol levels in seawater, sea-ice algae and soils near Davis Station in eastern Antarctica: a regional survey and preliminary results for a field fuel spill experiment. Marine Pollution Bulletin 25 (9–12): 293302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heyworth, J.S. 1991. Sampling and statistical analysis for assessing contaminated land sites. In: The health risk assessment and management of contaminated sites: proceedings of a national workshop. Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission: 1525.Google Scholar
Hobson, D.M. 1993. Rational site investigations. In: Cairney, T. (editor). Contaminated land: problems and solutions. London: Blackie Academic & Professional: 4648.Google Scholar
ICSU. 1980. A visitor's introduction to the Antarctic and its environment: report of the conservation sub-committee of the Working Group on Biology. Kingston, Tasmania: Australian Antarctic Division, on behalf of the International Council of Scientific Unions and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research.Google Scholar
Kerry, E. 1993. Bioremediation of experimental petroleum spills on mineral soils in the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica. Polar Biology 13: 163170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kriwoken, L. K. 1991. Antarctic environmental planning and management: conclusions from Casey, Australian Antarctic Territory. Polar Record 27 (160): 18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McFarland, R. 1991. Technical parameters for soil assessment. In: The health risk assessment and management of contaminated sites: proceedings of a national workshop. Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission: 9394.Google Scholar
Melick, D. 1991. Casey fuel spill – initial environmental report. Unpublished report prepared for the Australian Antarctic Division.Google Scholar
Pickard, J., and Seppelt, R.D.. 1984. Phytogeography of Antarctica. Journal of Biogeography 11: 83102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Piotrowski, M.R., Aaserude, R.G., and Schmidt, F.J.. 1992. Bioremediation of diesel contaminated soil and tundra in an Arctic environment. In: Kostecki, P.T., and Calabrese, E.J. (editors). Contaminated soils: diesel fuel contamination. Boca Raton: Lewis Publishers: 115141.Google Scholar
Tiller, K.G. 1991. Determining background levels. In: The health risk assessment and management of contaminated sites: proceedings of a national workshop. Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission: 98101.Google Scholar
72
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Identification and assessment of contaminated sites at Casey Station, Wilkes Land, Antarctica
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Identification and assessment of contaminated sites at Casey Station, Wilkes Land, Antarctica
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Identification and assessment of contaminated sites at Casey Station, Wilkes Land, Antarctica
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *