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The Number of Choice Tasks and Survey Satisficing in Conjoint Experiments

  • Kirk Bansak (a1), Jens Hainmueller (a2), Daniel J. Hopkins (a3) and Teppei Yamamoto (a4)
Abstract

In recent years, political and social scientists have made increasing use of conjoint survey designs to study decision-making. Here, we study a consequential question which researchers confront when implementing conjoint designs: How many choice tasks can respondents perform before survey satisficing degrades response quality? To answer the question, we run a set of experiments where respondents are asked to complete as many as 30 conjoint tasks. Experiments conducted through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and Survey Sampling International demonstrate the surprising robustness of conjoint designs, as there are detectable but quite limited increases in survey satisficing as the number of tasks increases. Our evidence suggests that in similar study contexts researchers can assign dozens of tasks without substantial declines in response quality.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
* Email: teppei@mit.edu
Footnotes
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Authors’ note: We thank the associate editor, two anonymous referees, Katrin Auspurg, Adam Berinsky, Thomas Hinz and the conference participants at the MPSA 2017 Annual Meeting, PolMeth XXXIV, and the University of Zurich for their helpful comments and suggestions. Replication materials for this article are available on the Political Analysis Dataverse as Bansak et al. (2017b).

Contributing Editor: Lonna Atkeson

Footnotes
References
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Political Analysis
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