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Should perinatal mental health be everyone’s business?

  • Susan Ayers (a1) and Judy Shakespeare (a2)
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References
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All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Conception to Age 2. 2013: The 1001 critical days: the importance of the conception to age two period. Retrieved 2 May 2015 from http://www.1001criticaldays.co.uk/UserFiles/files/1001_days_jan28_15_final.pdf
All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Conception to Age 2. 2015: Building Great Britons. Retrieved from http://www.1001criticaldays.co.uk/buildinggreatbritonsreport.pdf.
Bauer, A., Parsonage, M., Knapp, M., Iemmi, V. and Adelaja, B. 2014: Costs of perinatal mental health problems. London: Centre for Mental Health.
Ding, X.X., Wu, Y.L., Xu, S.J., Zhu, R.P., Jia, X.M., Zhang, S.F., Huang, K., Zhu, P., Hao, J.H. and Tao, F.B. 2014: Maternal anxiety during pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Journal of Affective Disorders 159, 103110.
Fontein-Kuipers, Y.J., Nieuwenhuijze, M.J., Ausems, M., Bude, L. and de Vries, R. 2014: Antenatal interventions to reduce maternal distress: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 121, 389397.
Glover, V. 2014: Maternal depression, anxiety and stress during pregnancy and child outcome; what needs to be done. Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology 28, 2535.
Khan, L. 2015. Falling through the gaps: perinatal mental health and general practice. London: Royal College of General Practitioners and Centre for Mental Health.
Kinsella, M.T. and Monk, C. 2009: Impact of maternal stress, depression and anxiety on fetal neurobehavioral development. Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology 52, 425440.
Knight, M., Kenyon, S., Brocklehurst, P., Neilson, J., Shakespeare, J. and Kurinczuk, J.J. (editors), on behalf of MBRRACE-UK. 2014: Saving lives, improving mothers’ care – lessons learned to inform future maternity care from the UK and Ireland confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and morbidity 2009–12. Oxford: National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford.
National Institute for Clinical Excellence. 2014: Antenatal and postnatal mental health: clinical management and service guidance (CG192). Retrieved 2 May 2015 from http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg192/evidence/cg192-antenatal-and-postnatal-mental-health-full-guideline3
Royal College of Psychiatrists. 2001. Perinatal mental health services. Recommendations for provision of services for childbearing women, CR88. London: Royal College of Psychiatrists.
Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network. 2012. Management of perinatal mood disorders. (SIGN Publication No. 127) Edinburgh: SIGN Retrieved 2 May 2015 from http://www.sign.ac.uk/guidelines/fulltext/127/
Talge, N.M., Neal, C. and Glover, V. 2007: Antenatal maternal stress and long-term effects on child neurodevelopment: how and why? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 48, 245261.
Wadhwa, P.D. 2005: Psychoneuroendocrine processes in human pregnancy influence fetal development and health. Psychoneuroendocrinology 30, 724743.
Yonkers, K.A., Smith, M.V., Forray, A., Epperson, C.N., Costello, D., Lin, H. and Belanger, K. 2014: Pregnant women with posttraumatic stress disorder and risk of preterm birth. JAMA Psychiatry 71, 897904.
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Primary Health Care Research & Development
  • ISSN: 1463-4236
  • EISSN: 1477-1128
  • URL: /core/journals/primary-health-care-research-and-development
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