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Contribution of energetic ion secondary particles to solar flare radio spectra

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 September 2017

Jordi Tuneu
Affiliation:
Center for Radio Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, Sao Paulo, Brazil email: jordituneu@protonmail.com
Sérgio Szpigel
Affiliation:
Center for Radio Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, Sao Paulo, Brazil email: jordituneu@protonmail.com
Guillermo Giménez de Castro
Affiliation:
Center for Radio Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, Sao Paulo, Brazil email: jordituneu@protonmail.com
Alexander MacKinnon
Affiliation:
School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK email: alexander.mackinnon@glasgow.ac.uk
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Abstract

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Recent observations of solar flares at high frequencies have provided evidence of a new spectral component with flux increasing with frequency in the THz range. Its origin remains unclear. Here, we present preliminary results of simulations of synchrotron emission due to secondary positrons and electrons produced in nuclear reactions during a solar flare. We use the general purpose Monte-Carlo code FLUKA to obtain distributions of secondary particles resulting from accelerated protons interacting in the solar atmosphere. We calculate the synchrotron radiation spectrum and compare our results to observations of the November 4th, 2003 burst event.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2017 

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