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Planetary nebulae and the chemical evolution of the galactic bulge: New abundances of older objects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2012

Oscar Cavichia
Affiliation:
IAG, University of São Paulo, 05508-900, São Paulo-SP, Brazil email: cavichia@astro.iag.usp.br
Roberto D. D. Costa
Affiliation:
IAG, University of São Paulo, 05508-900, São Paulo-SP, Brazil email: cavichia@astro.iag.usp.br
Mercedes Mollá
Affiliation:
CIEMAT, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain
Walter J. Maciel
Affiliation:
IAG, University of São Paulo, 05508-900, São Paulo-SP, Brazil email: cavichia@astro.iag.usp.br
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Abstract

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In view of their nature, planetary nebulae have very short lifetimes, and the chemical abundances derived so far have a natural bias favoring younger objects. In this work, we report physical parameters and abundances for a sample of old PNe located in the galactic bulge, based on low dispersion spectroscopy secured at the SOAR telescope using the Goodman Spectrograph. The new data allow us to extend our database including older, weaker objects that are at the faint end of the planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF). The results show that the abundances of our sample are lower than those from our previous work. Additionally, the average abundances of the galactic bulge do not follow the observed trend of the radial abundance gradient in the disk. These results are in agreement with a chemical evolution model for the Galaxy recently developed by our group.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2012

References

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