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    Aceves-Martins, Magaly Llauradó, Elisabet Tarro, Lucia Moreno-García, Carlos Francisco Trujillo Escobar, Tamy Goretty Solà, Rosa and Giralt, Montse 2016. Effectiveness of social marketing strategies to reduce youth obesity in European school-based interventions: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrition Reviews, Vol. 74, Issue. 5, p. 337.


    Alghadir, Ahmad H Gabr, Sami A and Iqbal, Zaheen A 2016. Television watching, diet and body mass index of school children in Saudi Arabia. Pediatrics International, Vol. 58, Issue. 4, p. 290.


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    Mason, P. 2012. Marketing to children: implications for obesity. Nutrition Bulletin, Vol. 37, Issue. 1, p. 86.


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Session 5: Nutrition communication Obesity and social marketing: works in progress: Symposium on ‘The challenge of translating nutrition research into public health nutrition’

  • Georgina Cairns (a1) and Martine Stead (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0029665108008768
  • Published online: 17 November 2008
Abstract

Internationally, socio-economic trends reinforce the complex physiological mechanisms that favour positive energy balance, leading to an accumulation of excess body weight and associated metabolic disorders. This so-called ‘obesogenic environment’ is characterised by increasing accessibility and affordability of energy-dense foods and declining levels of physical activity. In the face of such rapidly-rising obesity rates there is general consensus that strategies to address trends in weight gain must go forwards in the absence of complete evidence of cause or effective prevention strategy. Thus, strategy implementation and evaluation must contribute to, as well as be informed by, the evidence base. Social marketing research and practice has a track record that strongly indicates that it can contribute to both the evolving knowledge base on obesity and overweight control policy and the development of effective intervention strategies. Social marketing draws pragmatically on many disciplines to bring about voluntary behaviour change as well as requisite supporting policy and environmental change. Key objectives include: generating insights into the drivers of current behaviour patterns; important barriers to change; client-oriented approaches to new desirable diet and lifestyle choices. Social marketing recognises that target clients have the power to ensure success or failure of obesity control policies. Social marketing seeks to identify genuine exchange of benefits for target adopters of behaviour change and the advocates of change, and how they may be developed and offered within an appropriate relevant context. Social marketing adopts a cyclical approach of learning, strategic development and evaluation, and therefore is well placed to integrate with the multi-disciplinary demands of obesity prevention strategies.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Ms Georgina Cairns, fax +44 1786 466449, email g.a.cairns@stir.ac.uk
Linked references
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

3.WPT James (2008) The fundamental drivers of the obesity epidemic. Obes Rev 9, Suppl. 1, 613.

8.T Brown , S Kelly & C Summerbell (2007) Prevention of obesity: a review of interventions Obes Rev 8, Suppl. 1, 127130.

16.L Macdonald , S Cummins & S Macintyre (2007) Neighbourhood fast food environment and area deprivation – substitution or concentration? Appetite 49, 251254.

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Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
  • ISSN: 0029-6651
  • EISSN: 1475-2719
  • URL: /core/journals/proceedings-of-the-nutrition-society
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