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The African University as “Global” University

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2014

Isaac Kamola*
Affiliation:
Trinity College

Abstract

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Type
Symposium: Higher Education and World Politics
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2014 

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References

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