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New Directions in Legislative Research: Lessons from Inside Congress

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 July 2016

Michael H. Crespin
Affiliation:
University of Oklahoma
Anthony J. Madonna
Affiliation:
University of Georgia

Abstract

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Type
Politics Symposium: The Transformed Congressional Experience
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2016 

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References

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