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The Political Scientist as Local Campaign Consultant

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 April 2011

Robert E. Crew Jr.
Affiliation:
Florida State University

Extract

During my 45 years as an academic, I have followed the admonition sometimes attributed to the legendary Jedi warrior Obi-Wan Kenobe that political scientists should “use [their] power for good and not for evil.” In this spirit, I have devoted substantial portions of my career to public service by providing strategic advice and campaign management to candidates for small state and local elective offices—state legislature, county commission, city clerk or treasurer, school board, and the like—and supporters of citizen ballot initiatives. These campaigns generally cannot afford the professional campaign assistance that is now virtually a necessity for winning elections at all levels of government.

Type
Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2011

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References

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