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Reflections on the Evolution of a Research Program

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2015

Paul Pierson*
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley

Abstract

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Type
Symposium: Paul Pierson’s Dismantling the Welfare State: A Twentieth Anniversary Reassessment
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2015 

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References

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