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Negotiating the Transatlantic Relationship: An International, Interdisciplinary Simulation of a Real-World Negotiation

  • Mark T. Nance (a1), Gabriele Suder (a2) and Abigail Hall (a3)
Abstract

This article analyzes the effectiveness of an international, interdisciplinary simulation of an ongoing trade negotiation. It thoroughly describes the simulation, provides links to background information for public use, and offers suggestions on ways to further strengthen the learning outcomes achieved.

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References
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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