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Capacity to give evidence in court: issues that may arise when a client with dementia is a victim of crime

  • Rowena Jones (a1) and Tony Elliott (a2)
Extract

There are a number of issues that arise when an older person with dementia is a victim of crime. The safety of the individual and how to prevent further such incidents occurring is a clear priority. There may be considerations such as whether the person can continue to live safely at home. In addition, there is the prospect of future legal proceedings, and concerns such as the person's capacity to give evidence, and whether they will be able to cope with the pressures of attending court. Similar issues are also pertinent to younger people with serious mental illnesses living in the community.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Capacity to give evidence in court: issues that may arise when a client with dementia is a victim of crime

  • Rowena Jones (a1) and Tony Elliott (a2)
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