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Cognitive-analytical therapy – a most suitable training for psychiatrists?

  • Harvey Rees (a1)
Extract

Cognitive-analytical therapy (CAT) is a time-limited, integrated psychotherapy and its features have been extensively described (Ryle, 1990, 1995). It emerged as a formal psychotherapy method in 1990 and was developed with the aim of providing psychotherapy within the NHS. As the name suggests, the model integrates a wide range of theory and practice (psychoanalytical, cognitive and behavioural) yet retains a distinct method. This paper describes potential applications of CAT to general psychiatric practice and discusses the value of formal training for psychiatrists.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Cowmeadow, P. (1994) Deliberate self-harm and cognitive analytic therapy. International Journal of Brief Therapy, 9, 135150.
Denman, F. (1995) Treating eating disorders using CAT: two case examples. In Cognitive Analytic Therapy: Developments in Theory and Practice (ed. Ryle, A.). Chichester: John Wiley.
Grant, S., Holmes, J. & Watson, J. (1993) Guidelines for psychotherapy training as part of general professional training. Psychiatric Bulletin, 17, 695698.
Pierides, M. (1999) Writing to patients. Psychiatric Bulletin, 23, 385386.
Ryle, A. (1990) Cognitive Analytic Therapy: Active Participation in Change. Chichester: John Wiley.
Ryle, A. (ed.) (1995) Cognitive Analytic Therapy: Developments in Theory and Practice. Chichester: John Wiley.
Ryle, A. (1997) The structure and development of borderline personality disorder: a proposed model. British Journal of Psychiatry, 170, 8287.
Ryle, A. & Beard, H. (1993) The integrative effect of reformulation: Cognitive analytic therapy with a patient with borderline personality disorder. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 66, 249258.
Watts, D. & Morgan, H. G. (1994) Malignant alienation. British Journal of Psychiatry, 164, 1115.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Cognitive-analytical therapy – a most suitable training for psychiatrists?

  • Harvey Rees (a1)
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eLetters

Cognitive Analytical Therapy & PTSD

Brian Sanson, RMN
17 May 2005

A very close member of my family was offered CAT as a treatment of choice (ie the only choice offered) for severe chronic PTSD - those who are aware of the essentialy collaborative nature of CAT will by now have guessed that the patient was not able to collaborate with a treatment that asked them to take responsibility for hyper vigilance,intrusive relieving of the precipitating trauma and the absolute crushing of their will to live, the abscence of a theraputic relationship or any agreement as to the aims and goals of this intervention added to the damage which was done. This person is now assessed as a high risk of suicidethanks to CAT. I urge people to tailor the teatment to theproblem and the problem to the treatment ... More

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