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Increasing psychosocial assessment by introducing a self-harm pathway

  • Peter Lepping (a1), Barbara Woodworth (a2), Lucy Roberts (a3) and Jim Turner (a4)
Abstract
Aims and Method

To audit whether the introduction of a self-harm pathway and protocol increases the number of psychosocial assessments. All episodes of self-harm in a defined period during 2002 (n=335) and 2004 (n=390) were reviewed before and after the introduction of a self-harm pathway and protocol. Adherence to the protocol was also investigated.

Results

After the introduction of the self-harm pathway and protocol, the proportion of psychosocial assessments requested had risen from 57% (2002) to 85% (2004). The proportion of psychosocial assessments completed had risen from 47% to 70%. Over the 2 years, the overall number of self-harm presentations was reduced by 27%.

Clinical Implications

The introduction of a self-harm pathway and protocol through a self-harm steering group is feasible, was well accepted and increased the number of psychosocial assessments after self-harm. It may also contribute to a reduction in the number of overall presentations with self-harm to the accident and emergency department.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Increasing psychosocial assessment by introducing a self-harm pathway

  • Peter Lepping (a1), Barbara Woodworth (a2), Lucy Roberts (a3) and Jim Turner (a4)
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