Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Is psychoeducation routinely provided in the UK? Survey of community mental health teams

  • Henok Getachew (a1), Sara Dimic (a2) and Stefan Priebe (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

The study aimed to assess the current provision of psychoeducation programmes for patients with mental illness in the UK. A postal questionnaire was sent randomly to 100 community mental health teams regarding the delivery and characteristics of psychoeducation programmes. Non-responders were contacted via telephone after 8 weeks.

Results

The response rate was 87%. Eight services provided group psychoeducation, 40 provided individual psychoeducation within the care programme approach, and 39 did not provide any psychoeducation programme.

Clinical Implications

Patients with mental illnesses have limited access to psychoeducation in routine care. Group programmes should perhaps be more widely implemented as a relatively low-cost intervention.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Is psychoeducation routinely provided in the UK? Survey of community mental health teams
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Is psychoeducation routinely provided in the UK? Survey of community mental health teams
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Is psychoeducation routinely provided in the UK? Survey of community mental health teams
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Altamura, A. C., Bobes, J., Cunningham Owens, D., et al (2000) Principle of practice from the European Expert Panel on Contemporary Treatment of Schizophrenia. International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice, 4 (suppl. 1), 111.
American Psychiatric Association (2004) Guidelines for Treatment of Schizophrenia. APA.
Chabannes, J. P., Bazin, N., Leguay, D., et al (2008) Two-year study of relapse prevention by a new education program in schizophrenic patients treated with the same antipsychotic drug. European Psychiatry, 23, 813.
Colom, F., Vieta, E., Sánchez-Moreno, J., et al (2004) Psychoeducation in bipolar patients with comorbid personality disorders. Bipolar Disorders, 6, 294298.
Deutsche Gesellschaft Fur Psychiatrie, Psychotherapie und Nervenheilkunde (DGPPN) (2006) S–3–Behandlungsleitlinie Schizophrenie. Steinkopff Darmstadt.
Lincoln, T. M., Wilhem, K. & Nestoriuc, Y. (2007) Effectiveness of psychoeducation for relapse, symptoms, knowledge, adherence and functioning in psychotic disorders: a meta-analysis. Schizophrenia Research, 96, 232245.
National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (2006) The Management of Bipolar Affective Disorder in Adults, Children and Adolescents on Primary and Secondary Care. NICE.
Pekkala, E. & Merinder, L. (2002) Psychoeducation for schizophrenia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2, CD002831.
Soares, J. J. F., Stinzing, C. P., Jackson, C., et al (1997) Psychoeducation for patients with bipolar disorder: an exploratory study. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 51, 439446.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 21 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 107 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 21st July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Is psychoeducation routinely provided in the UK? Survey of community mental health teams

  • Henok Getachew (a1), Sara Dimic (a2) and Stefan Priebe (a3)
Submit a response

eLetters

Running Group Psychoeducation sessions on Acute Psychiatry Ward

Kamini Vasudev, Specialist Registrar, Adult Psychiatry
12 May 2009

In a recent study, Getachew et al., 2009 highlight that patients withmental illnesses have limited access to psychoeducation in routine care and recommend implementation of group psychoeducation programmes as a low cost intervention.

I would like to share my experience of running a psychoeducation group on an acute adult Psychiatry ward for a period of 6 months. This wasa 16 bedded female ward on which 'protected time' was normally provided tothe patients between 1.30 and 3pm every day for holding group therapeutic activities. My suggestion of holding psychoeducation sessions once a fortnight during this time was warmly welcomed by the ward manager.

All the patients were invited and encouraged to attend the group. Those who felt they didn’t want to join, particularly the ones who were acutely unwell, were excused. The sessions were informal and were supported by members of nursing staff. The patients were encouraged to decide the topic for discussion. A quiz was designed which was sometimes used as an icebreaker. The quiz had questions on mental illnesses, medication, drugs and alcohol.

A variety of topics were discussed over the 6 months period. The patients were particularly keen to understand the diagnostic criteria and symptoms of common illnesses like depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. They would often relate to their personal experiences and share these with each other. It was interesting to note that the same patients who did not agree with having a mental illness on one occasion would often demonstrate a good insight a few weeks later and be amenable to discussion of their illness and treatment.

The pharmacological and psychological treatment options available to treat mental illness was another popular topic in these sessions. The patients were eager to know the side-effects of various classes of psychotropic agents and the rationale for their long-term use.

'Why me?’ was another frequently asked question. The patients were able to appreciate the stress-vulnerability model to try to answer this question relating to their personal experience/circumstances. Other topicsrequested to cover were alcohol and drugs; brain anatomy and role of neurotransmitters; principles of cognitive and behavioural therapy; physical health issues related to mental illness and psychotropic medication.

The patients found the group psychoeducation sessions interesting andhelpful, as reflected by the evaluation forms. They also provided constructive suggestions to improve the sessions.

Personally it was a satisfying experience and also sharpened my communication, leadership and organisational skills. One of the challengesfaced was, use of simple language, free from medical jargon and understandable to the patients; particularly in the session on brain anatomy and physiology. To deal with questions or statements made by patients who were thought disordered and to keep the session running simultaneously required some skills!

A pubmed literature search on psychoeducation on psychiatry in-patient wards revealed one study where this was used as one of the methodsto address dual disorder of substance misuse and mental disorder (Ahrens, 1998). More research is required to explore the long-term impact of holding group psychoeducation sessions on in-patient wards.

Declaration of interest: Nil

References

AHRENS, M.P. (1998). A model for dual disorder treatment in acute psychiatry in a VA population. J Subst Abuse Treat, 15 (2), 107-12.

GETACHEW, H., DIMIC, H. AND PRIEBE, S. (2009). Is psychoeducation routinely provided in the UK? Survey of community mental health teams. Psychiatric Bulletin, 33 (3), 102-3.
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *