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‘New’ professionalism or professionalism derailed?

  • Nick Brown (a1) and Dinesh Bhugra (a2)
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Clark, C. (2005) The deprofessionalism thesis, accountability and professional character. Social Work and Society, 3, 182190.
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NHS Employers (2007) The Future of the Medical Workforce. http://www.nhsemployers.org/workforce/workforce-2193.cfm
Rosen, R. & Dewar, S. (2004) On Being A Doctor. King's Fund.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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‘New’ professionalism or professionalism derailed?

  • Nick Brown (a1) and Dinesh Bhugra (a2)
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eLetters

�New� Professionalism and the Trainee Psychiatrist

Rajashekhar M madgula, specialist registrar in Psychiatry
30 August 2007

The editorial by Brown and Bhugra (Psychiatric Bulletin, August 2007,31: 281-283) discussed fundamental issues and challenges facing the psychiatric profession. The reference to training, I felt was quite brief and merits further exploration. The trainees are the future professionals and how they are influenced by these changes is critical to the future of this professional body. I wonder if the new entrants, who are still experiencing the euphoria of securing a training post are aware of their career trajectories i.e Consultant vs ‘Technician’.

As crisis assessments become more the domain of experienced nurses, trainees on call spend more time clerking and doing physical examination.Is crucial experience in assessing DSH and crises compromised where joint medical and nursing assessments are more an exception than the norm? How does one advise juniors in the future as a higher speciality trainee or consultant if the exposure in the formative years is inadequate?

MMC and PMETB have created curricula and assessments to ensure that future doctors are fit for purpose. Evidently, it begs the question – Whose purpose? Economic pressures have cut into study leave budgets. Politically driven national policies have led to the functional splitting of teams in addition to New Ways of Working . How do trusts design holistic training programmes when providing fragmented services? Is 4-6 months of only inpatient or outpatient experience better than 3 days inpatient and 2 days outpatient a week system? Does one year in psychosis followed by another in non psychosis prepare one for a career in adult psychiatry compared to seeing a mix of patients in each year of training? Will there be a place for general psychiatrists in Liaison, Rehabilitation, Crisis, Dual Diagnosis, Early intervention, Psychosis and Non Psychosis teams in the future. While more services and resources are diverted to primary careshould trainees start doing clinics in GP surgeries?

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