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The publication of case studies and confidentiality – an ethical predicament

  • Anne Patterson (a1)
Extract

Writing about psychoanalysis or psychotherapy has traditionally included illustrative clinical material which helps to clarify and enliven complex theories. However, there is increasing interest in the ethical questions raised by the publication of confidential clinical material, informed by a post-modern culture emphasising individual rights and empowerment, increasingly supported in law, and equally, fascinated by celebrity and disclosure. It seems important for psychiatrists to engage in this debate which has implications for the future communication of clinical findings between psychotherapists and psychiatrists.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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The publication of case studies and confidentiality – an ethical predicament

  • Anne Patterson (a1)
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