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The rise and fall of anti-psychiatry

  • Mervat Nasser (a1)
Abstract

A review is made of the anti-psychiatric movement through its major protagonists, Lacan, Laing, Cooper and Szasz. The ideology was set to challenge the concept of mental illness and question the authority of the psychiatrist and the need for mental health institutions. The anti-psychiatric movement received a lot of attention in the 1970s but is now considered to be of the past and of likely interest to the psychiatric historian. However, the impact of the movement on current psychiatric practice requires further re-examination and appraisal.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Bentall, R. (1993) Thomas Szasz, crazy talk and the myth of mental illness (comment). British Journal of Medical Psychology. 66, 6976.
Bowie, M. (1987) Freud, Proust, and Lacan, Theory as Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Breggin, P. R. (1975) Psychiatry and psychotherapy as political processes. American Journal of Psychotherapy, 29, 3.
Cooper, D. (1971) Psychiatry and Anti-psychiatry. London: Paladin.
Cooper, D. (1980) The Language of Madness. London: Pelican Books.
Foucault, M. (1971) Madness and Civilisation. London: Tavistock.
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Goffman, E. (1961) Asylums – essays on the social situations of the mental patients and other inmates. London: Penguin Books.
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Kennedy, I. (1980) Great Caution Must be Exercised in Visiting the Status of Mentally Ill on Anyone. The Reith Lectures: Unmasking Medicine.
Lacan, J. (1947) Propos sur la Causalité Psychique. Paris: Seuil.
Lacan, J. (1968) “The Mirror phase”, the functions of language in psychoanalysis. New Left Review, 5.
Laing, R. D. (1967) The Politics of Experience. New York: Pantheon Books.
Laing, R. D. (1969) The Dialectics of Liberation (with D. Cooper). New York: Collier Books.
Laing, R. D. (1971) Sanity, Madness and the Family (with A. Esterson). New York: Basic Books.
Szasz, T. (1972) The Myth of Mental Illness. Foundations of a theory of personal construct London: Granada Publishing.
Szasz, T. (1972) Bad habits are not diseases. Lancet, ii, 128.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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The rise and fall of anti-psychiatry

  • Mervat Nasser (a1)
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