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Mental disorder, criminal responsibility and the social history of theories of volition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

Roger Smith*
Affiliation:
Department of History, University of Lancaster
*
1Address for correspondence: Dr Roger Smith, Department of History, University of Lancaster, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YG.

Synopsis

Nineteenth-century theories of human volition are discussed in relation to ideas on insanity and responsibility. Attention is drawn to the importance of accounts of volition for medical psychologists and to the implications of these accounts for medical and lay discussion of criminal responsibility.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1979

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