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Preliminary Communication Thyro-endocrine pathology, obstetric morbidity and schizophrenia: survey of a hundred families with a schizophrenic proband

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

David MacSweeney*
Affiliation:
MRC Neuropsychiatry Unit, Carshalton and West Park Hospital, Epsom, Surrey
Pauline Timms
Affiliation:
MRC Neuropsychiatry Unit, Carshalton and West Park Hospital, Epsom, Surrey
Anthony Johnson
Affiliation:
MRC Neuropsychiatry Unit, Carshalton and West Park Hospital, Epsom, Surrey
*
1Address for correspondence: Dr David MacSweeney, Academic Department of Psychiatry, Middlesex Hospital Medical School, London W1P 8AA.

Synopsis

This preliminary communication reports that the mothers of 104 schizophrenic patients had: (1) a significantly higher incidence of thyroid disease than a carefully matched control group; (2) significantly more abortions, still-births and greater infant mortality. The findings and possible relevance of thyroid disease to schizophrenia are discussed. Three prospective studies currently in progress are outlined.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1978

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References

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