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Depression trajectories and obesity among the elderly in Taiwan

  • S.-Y. Kuo (a1), K.-M. Lin (a2), C.-Y. Chen (a2) (a3), Y.-L. Chuang (a4) and W. J. Chen (a5) (a6)...
Abstract
Background

The present study aimed to (a) characterize 10-year trajectory patterns of depressive symptoms and (b) investigate the association between depressive trajectory and subsequent obesity, metabolic function and cortisol level.

Method

In a prospective study of Taiwanese adults aged ⩾60 years (n=3922) between 1989 and 1999, depression was assessed using a 10-item short-form of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and information on body mass index (BMI) was collected by self-report. A subsample (n=445) of the original cohort in 1989 was drawn to assess metabolic variables and cortisol levels in a 2000 follow-up. After trajectory analyses were performed, multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the association estimates.

Results

We identified four distinctive trajectories of depressive symptoms: class 1 (persistent low, 41.8%); class 2 (persistent mild, 46.8%); class 3 (late peak, 4.2%); and class 4 (high-chronic, 7.2%). The results from both complete cases and multiple imputation analyses indicated that the odds of obesity were lower in the class 2, 3 or 4 elderly, as compared with those in class 1, while the odds of underweight were higher. The classes of older adults with more and persistent depressive symptoms showed a trend toward having both a lower BMI (p=0.01) and a higher cortisol level (p=0.04) compared with those with low depressive symptoms.

Conclusions

Incremental increases in depressive symptoms over time were associated with reduced risk of obesity and higher cortisol levels.

Copyright
Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: W. J. Chen, M.D., Sc.D., Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, 17 Xu-Zhou Road, Taipei 100, Taiwan. (Email: wjchen@ntu.edu.tw)
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Psychological Medicine
  • ISSN: 0033-2917
  • EISSN: 1469-8978
  • URL: /core/journals/psychological-medicine
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