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The study of gene–environment interactions in psychiatry: limited gains at a substantial cost?

  • S. Zammit (a1) (a2), N. Wiles (a2) and G. Lewis (a2)
Abstract

There is an ever-increasing body of literature examining gene–environment interactions in psychiatry, reflecting a widespread belief that such studies will aid identification of novel risk factors for disease, increase understanding about underlying pathological mechanisms, and aid identification of high-risk groups for targeted interventions. In this article we discuss to what extent studies of gene–environment interactions are likely to lead to any such benefits in the future.

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Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: Dr S. Zammit, Department of Psychological Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN, Wales, UK. (Email: zammits@cardiff.ac.uk)
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Psychological Medicine
  • ISSN: 0033-2917
  • EISSN: 1469-8978
  • URL: /core/journals/psychological-medicine
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