Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Breast-feeding initiation and exclusive breast-feeding in rural Vietnam

  • Dat V Duong (a1) (a2), Colin W Binns (a2) and Andy H Lee (a2)

Abstract

Objective:

To investigate the initiation of breast-feeding and exclusive breast-feeding within the first week after delivery for women in rural Vietnam.

Design:

An interviewer-administered survey was conducted on a sample of rural women who gave birth during August-October 2002.

Setting:

Quang Xuong District, Thanh Hoa Province of Vietnam.

Subjects:

Four hundred and sixty-three women participated in the study, of whom 181 delivered at the district hospital (39.1%), 229 at a commune health centre (49.5%) and 53 at home attended by a traditional birth attendant (11.4%).

Results:

Although the initiation and exclusive breast-feeding rates were relatively high at 98.3% and 83.6% respectively, the premature introduction of complementary food was a great concern. Logistic regression analysis showed that, together with socio-cultural determinants such as feeding preferences of the husband and maternal grandmother, feeding practices of friends, factors relating to delivery methods, delivery locations and health problems could influence the initiation rate and breast-feeding patterns.

Conclusions:

To promote breast-feeding practices of rural mothers, health education on breast-feeding should take into account local socio-cultural features in addition to improving the counselling skills of health workers.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Breast-feeding initiation and exclusive breast-feeding in rural Vietnam
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Breast-feeding initiation and exclusive breast-feeding in rural Vietnam
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Breast-feeding initiation and exclusive breast-feeding in rural Vietnam
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email dat@unfpa.org.vn

References

Hide All
1Dewey, KG, Cohen, RJ, Brown, KH, Rivera, LL. Effects of exclusive breastfeeding for four versus six months on maternal nutritional status and infant motor development: results of two randomized trials in Honduras. Journal of Nutrition 2001; 131(2): 262–7.
2Arifeen, S, Black, RE, Antelman, G, Baqui, A, Caulfield, L, Becker, S. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces acute respiratory infection and diarrhea deaths among infants in Dhaka slums. Pediatrics 2001; 108(4): E67.
3Kramer, M, Kakuma, R. The Optimal Duration of Exclusive Breastfeeding – A Systematic Review. WHO/NHD/01.08. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2002.
4National Institute of Nutrition/United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Vietnam National Nutrition Survey. Hanoi: National Institute of Nutrition/UNICEF, 1999.
5World Bank. Vietnam Growing Healthy: A Review of Vietnam's Health Sector Review. Hanoi: World Bank, 2001.
6Committee for Population Family and Children. Demographic and Health Survey. Hanoi: Committee for Population Family and Children, 2003.
7Ministry of Health of Vietnam. National Nutrition Strategy for the Period 2001–2010. Hanoi: Ministry of Health of Vietnam, 2001.
8Rossiter, JC, Yam, BM. Breastfeeding: how could it be enhanced? The perceptions of Vietnamese women in Sydney, Australia. Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health 2000; 45(3): 271–6.
9Sharma, A, Lynch, MA, Irvine, ML. The availability of advice regarding infant feeding to immigrants of Vietnamese origin: a survey of families and health visitors. Child: Care, Health and Development 1994; 20(5): 349–54.
10Hop, LT, Gross, R, Giay, T, Sastroamidjojo, S, Schultink, W, Lang, NT. Premature complementary feeding is associated with poorer growth of Vietnamese children. Journal of Nutrition 2000; 130(11): 2683–90.
11Dearden, KA, Quan le, N, Do, M, Marsh, DR, Pachon, H, Schroeder, DG, et al. Work outside the home is the primary barrier to exclusive breastfeeding in rural Viet Nam: insights from mothers who exclusively breastfed and worked. Food and Nutrition Bulletin 2002; 23(4): 101–8.
12Morrow, M. Breastfeeding in Vietnam: poverty, tradition, and economic transition. Journal of Human Lactation 1996; 12(2): 97103.
13Doyle, N. Key Family Practices: Building Better Child–care–interventions. Hanoi: Ministry of Health of Vietnam, 2001.
14Ministry of Health of Vietnam. Key Family Practices of Mothers of Children under 5 years old in Nine Target Districts. Hanoi: Ministry of Health of Vietnam, 2001.
15Quang Xuong District Health Service. Quang Xuong District Health Report March 2000. Thanh Hoa, Vietnam: Quang Xuong District Health Service, 2000.
16World Medical Assembly (WMA). Declaration of Helsinki. Adopted by the 18th WMA, Helsinki, Finland, June 1964, and amended by the 29th WMA, Tokyo, Japan, October 1975; the 35th WMA, Venice, Italy, October 1983; the 41st WMA, Hong Kong, September 1989; and the 48th General Assembly, Somerset West, Republic of South Africa, 10 1996.
17National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans. Canberra: NHMRC, 1999.
18Scott, JA, Landers, MC, Hughes, RM, Binns, CW. Factors associated with breastfeeding at discharge and duration of breastfeeding. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 2001; 37(3): 254–61.
19Scott, JA. Determinants of the initiation and duration of breastfeeding. PhD thesis, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia.
20General Statistical Office of Vietnam. General Population Census of Vietnam. Hanoi: General Statistical Office of Vietnam, 2000.
21Donath, S, Amir, L. Rates of breastfeeding in Australia by state and socio-economic status: evidence from the 1995 National Health Survey. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 2000; 36(2): 164–8.
22Ryan, AS, Wenjun, Z, Acosta, A. Breastfeeding continues to increase into the new millennium. Pediatrics 2002; 110(6): 1103–9.
23Ministry of Health of Vietnam. Evaluation of Twenty Years of Implementation of Primary Health Care in Vietnam. Hanoi: Ministry of Health of Vietnam, 1999.
24Central Census Steering Committee. 1999 Population and Housing Census. Hanoi: Central Census Steering Committee,2000.
25Rao, S, Kanade, AN. Prolonged breastfeeding and malnutrition among rural Indian children below 3 years of age. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1992; 46(3): 187–95.
26Banapurmath, CR, Selvamuthukumarasamy, A. Initiation of breastfeeding in cesarean section mothers: antenatal advise versus postnatal assistance. Indian Pediatrics 1995; 32(8): 902–5.
27Rowe-Murray, HJ, Fisher, JR. Baby friendly hospital practices: cesarean section is a persistent barrier to early initiation of breastfeeding. Birth 2002; 29(2): 124–31.
28Sharps, PW, El-Mohandes, AA, Nabil El-Khorazaty, M, Kiely, M, Walker, T. Health beliefs and parenting attitudes influence breastfeeding patterns among low-income African-American women. Journal of Perinatology 2003; 23(5): 414–9.
29Kendall-Tackett, KA, Sugarman, M. The social consequences of long-term breastfeeding. Journal of Human Lactation 1995; 11(3): 179–83.
30American Academy of Pediatrics. Breastfeeding and the use of human milk. American Academy of Pediatrics. Work Group on Breastfeeding. Pediatrics 1997; 100(6): 1035–9.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed