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Comparison of BMI and anthropometric measures among South Asian Indians using standard and modified criteria

  • Deepa Vasudevan (a1), Angela L Stotts (a1), Sreedhar Mandayam (a2) and L Anabor Omegie (a3)
Abstract
Objective

To compare the prevalence rates of obesity based on BMI/anthropometric measures, using WHO standard and ethnicity-specific criteria, the National Cholesterol Education Program–Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions, among a migrant South Asian Indian population.

Design

Cross-sectional study conducted in October 2007.

Subjects

A total of 213 participants of South Asian descent over the age of 18 years. Measures included a questionnaire with basic demographic information and self-reported histories of diabetes, coronary artery disease and/or hypercholesterolaemia. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference and blood pressure measurements were obtained.

Setting

Houston and surrounding suburbs.

Results

WHO-modified (WHO-mod) BMI and IDF waist circumference (WC) criteria independently identified higher numbers of overweight/obese participants; however, when the WHO-mod BMI or IDF WC criteria were applied, nearly 75 % of participants were categorized as overweight/obese – a proven risk factor for the future development of metabolic syndrome.

Conclusions

Obesity is likely under-diagnosed using the standard WHO and NCEP-ATPIII guidelines. Stressing the use of modified criteria more universally to classify obesity among South Asian Indians may be optimal to identify obesity and help appropriately risk stratify for intervention to prevent chronic diseases.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email Deepa.A.Vasudevan@uth.tmc.edu
References
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