Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Sociodemographic variations in obesity among Ghanaian adults

  • Albert GB Amoah (a1) (a2)
Abstract
AbstractObjectives:

To determine the sociodemographic associations of obesity in Ghana.

Design:

A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on a sample of 6300 adults aged 25 years and over who were selected by random cluster sampling.

Setting:

Two urban (high-class and low-class suburbs) and a rural community in Accra, Ghana.

Subjects and methods:

In total, 4731 (1857 males, 2874 females) subjects participated. Demographic data were obtained by a questionnaire and height and weight were determined with subjects in light clothing and without shoes.

Results:

The overall crude prevalence of overweight and obesity was 23.4 and 14.1%, respectively. The rates of overweight (27.1 vs. 17.5%) and obesity (20.2 vs. 4.6%) were higher in females than males. Obesity increased with age up to 64 years. There were more overweight and obesity in the urban high-class residents compared with the low-class residents and in urban than rural subjects. Overweight and obesity were highest among the Akan and Ga tribes and relatively low among Ewes. Subjects with tertiary education had the highest prevalence of obesity (18.8%) compared with less literate and illiterate subjects (12.5–13.8%). Subjects whose jobs were of a sedentary nature had higher levels of obesity (15%) than subjects whose jobs involved heavy physical activity (10%). Subjects who did not engage in leisure-time physical activity were more obese than those who had three or more sessions of leisure-time physical activity per week (15.3 vs. 13.5%).

Conclusions:

Overweight and obesity are common among residents in the Accra area. Older age, female gender, urban, high-class residence, sedentary occupation and tertiary education were associated with higher levels of obesity. Policies and programmes that promote healthy lifestyles may prove beneficial.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Sociodemographic variations in obesity among Ghanaian adults
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Sociodemographic variations in obesity among Ghanaian adults
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Sociodemographic variations in obesity among Ghanaian adults
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email agbamoah@ghana.com
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

2JC Siedell . Time trends in obesity: an epidemiological perspective. Hormone and Metabolic Research 1997; 29: 155–8.

4I Wickelgen . Obesity: how big a problem?. Science 1998; 280: 1364–7.

5M Stern . Epidemiology of obesity and its link to heart disease. Metabolism 1995; 44: (Suppl. 3): 13.

6E Ferrannini . Physiological and metabolic consequences of obesity. Metabolism 1995; 44: (Suppl. 3): 15–7.

7P Bjorntorp . Endocrine abnormalities in obesity. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental 1995; 44: 2130.

9JP Deslypere . Obesity and cancer. Metabolism 1995; 44: (Suppl. 3): 24–7.

10GA Bray . Health hazards of obesity. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America 1996; 25: 907–19.

11BM Popkin . The nutrition transition in low-income countries: an emerging crisis. Nutrition Reviews 1994; 52: 285–98.

16AGB Amoah , SK Owusu , S Adjei . Diabetes in Ghana: a community based prevalence studying Greater Accra. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 2002; 56: 197205.

17KGMM Alberti , PZ Zimmet for the WHO Consultation. Definition, diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Part 1: diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus. Provisional report of WHO Consultation. Diabetic Medicine 1998; 15: 539–53.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: