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Egg consumption and CHD and stroke mortality: a prospective study of US adults

  • Carolyn G Scrafford (a1) (a2), Nga L Tran (a1) (a3), Leila M Barraj (a1) and Pamela J Mink (a4)
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To evaluate the relationship between egg consumption and CHD and stroke mortality using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1988–1994 (NHANES III) and follow-up survey.

Design

A cross-sectional survey using a stratified, multi-stage probability sample was analysed, adjusting for survey design. Egg consumption was obtained from the FFQ and separated into categories of egg intake. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated for CHD and stroke mortality using multivariate Cox regression models.

Setting

A health and nutrition survey conducted in the USA from 1988 to 1994 with follow-up through 31 December 2000.

Subjects

The study population included men and women who were free of CVD and had completed a FFQ at baseline.

Results

Multivariate models adjusting for health, lifestyle and dietary factors indicated that ‘high’ egg consumption (≥7 times/week v. <1 time/week) was not associated with significantly increased CHD mortality (HR = 1·13, 95 % CI 0·61, 2·11 (men); HR = 0·92, 95 % CI 0·27, 3·11 (women)). There was a statistically significant inverse association between ‘high’ egg consumption and stroke mortality among men (HR = 0·27, 95 % CI 0·10, 0·73), but the estimate was imprecise because of sparse data. We did not observe a statistically significant positive association between ‘high’ egg consumption and CHD or stroke mortality in analyses restricted to individuals with diabetes, but these analyses may be limited due to the small number of diabetics.

Conclusions

We did not find a significant positive association between egg consumption and increased risk of mortality from CHD or stroke in the US population. These results corroborate the findings of previous studies.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email cscrafford@exponent.com
References
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  • ISSN: 1368-9800
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