Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Food appearances in children’s television programmes in Iceland

  • Steingerdur Olafsdottir (a1) and Christina Berg (a2)
Abstract
Objective

Exposure to advertisements cannot fully explain the associations between young children’s dietary intake and the time they spend in front of the television. It is therefore of importance to study television content other than advertisements in this aspect. The present study aimed to examine the nature and extent of verbal and visual appearances of foods and beverages in children’s television programmes on Icelandic public service television.

Design

A total of 27 h of children’s programmes (domestic and internationally produced) were watched. All verbal and visual appearances of foods and beverages were coded, as well as the context in which the foods/beverages were discussed or appeared.

Setting

Children’s programmes on Icelandic public service television.

Subjects

Two food groups were of special interest for their importance from a public health perspective: high-calorie and low-nutrient (HCLN) foods and fruits and vegetables (F&V). The χ 2 test and logistic regression were performed to analyse if the occurrence of the two groups was associated with the context where foods/beverages appeared.

Results

Of the 125 different programmes, a food or beverage appeared in 86 %. Of the total food appearances (n 599), HCLN foods accounted for 26 % and F&V for 23 %. HCLN foods were presented as desirable by appearing more frequently with child characters (P<0·01) than F&V.

Conclusions

Public service television has the potential to improve the way food and eating is presented in children’s programmes, as young childhood is a critical period for founding healthy habits for later life.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Food appearances in children’s television programmes in Iceland
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Food appearances in children’s television programmes in Iceland
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Food appearances in children’s television programmes in Iceland
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: Email steingeo@hi.is
References
Hide All
1. Matthiessen, J, Andersen, L, Barbieri, H et al. (2017) Status and Development of Diet, Physical Activity, Smoking, Alcohol and Overweight. Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers.
2. Boynton-Jarrett, R, Thomas, T, Peterson, K et al. (2003) Impact of television viewing patterns on fruit and vegetable consumption among adolescents. Pediatrics 112, 13211326.
3. Wiecha, J, Peterson, K, Ludwig, D et al. (2006) When children eat what they watch: impact of television viewing on dietary intake in youth. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 160, 436442.
4. Barr-Anderson, DJ, Larson, NI, Nelson, MC et al. (2009) Does television viewing predict dietary intake five years later in high school students and young adults? Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 6, 7.
5. Hare-Bruun, H, Nielsen, BM, Kristensen, PL et al. (2011) Television viewing, food preferences, and food habits among children: a prospective epidemiological study. BMC Public Health 11, 311.
6. Pearson, N, Ball, K & Crawford, D (2011) Mediators of longitudinal associations between television viewing and eating behaviours in adolescents. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 8, 23.
7. Olafsdottir, S, Berg, C, Eiben, G et al. (2014) Young children’s screen activities, sweet drink consumption and anthropometry: results from a prospective European study. Eur J Clin Nutr 68, 223228.
8. Cairns, G, Angus, K & Hastings, G (2009) The Extent, Nature and Effects of Food Promotion to Children: A Review of the Evidence to December 2008. Geneva: WHO.
9. Kelly, B, Halford, JCG, Boyland, EJ et al. (2010) Television food advertising to children: a global perspective. Am J Public Health 100, 17301736.
10. Boyland, E, Nolan, S, Kelly, B et al. (2016) Advertising as a cue to consume: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of acute exposure to unhealthy food and nonalcoholic beverage advertising on intake in children and adults. Am J Clin Nutr 103, 519533.
11. Norman, J, Kelly, B, Boyland, E et al. (2016) The impact of marketing and advertising on food behaviours: evaluating the evidence for a causal relationship. Curr Nutr Rep 5, 139149.
12. Olafsdottir, S, Eiben, G, Prell, H et al. (2014) Young children’s screen habits are associated with consumption of sweetened beverages independently of parental norms. Int J Public Health 59, 6775.
13. Folkvord, F, Anschütz, DJ, Boyland, E et al. (2016) Food advertising and eating behavior in children. Curr Opin Behav Sci 9, 2631.
14. Goldman, JE & Descartes, L (2016) Food depictions in picture books for preschool children: frequency, centrality, and affect. Appetite 96, 203208.
15. NORDICOM (n.d.) Mediestatistik. http://www.nordicom.gu.se/sv/mediefakta/mediestatistik (accessed July 2016).
16. Gallup (n.d.) Sjónvarp (Television). http://www.gallup.is/nidurstodur/sjonvarp/ (accessed January 2017).
17. Roseman, M, Poor, M & Stephenson, T (2014) A content analysis of food references in television programming specifically targeting viewing audiences aged 11 to 14 years. J Nutr Educ Behav 46, 2025.
18. Scully, P, Reid, O, Macken, A et al. (2016) Food and beverage cues in children’s television programmes: the influence of programme genre. Public Health Nutr 19, 616624.
19. Greenberg, BS, Rosaen, SF, Worell, TR et al. (2009) A portrait of food and drink in commercial TV series. Health Commun 24, 295303.
20. Eisenberg, M, Larson, N, Gollust, S et al. (2016) Snacking on television: a content analysis of adolescents’ favorite shows. Prev Chronic Dis 13, E66.
21. Radnitz, C, Byrne, S, Goldman, R et al. (2008) Food cues in children’s television programs. Appetite 52, 230233.
22. Olafsdottir, S & Berg, C (2016) Food appearances in children’s television programmes in Sweden. Int J Consum Stud 40, 484491.
23. Icelandic Parliament (2013) Act on the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service, a public service medium (Lög um Ríkisútvarpið, fjölmiðil í almannaþágu, nr. 23/2013). https://www.althingi.is/altext/stjt/2013.023.html (accessed September 2016).
24. Icelandic Parliament (2011) Media Law no. 38/2011. http://www.althingi.is/lagas/nuna/2011038.html (accessed September 2016).
25. Buijzen, M, Rozendaal, E & de Droog, SM (2014) Food marketing and child health. In Young People, Media and Health: Risks and Rights, pp. 121128 [C von Feilitzen and J Stenersen, editors]. Gothenburg: International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media/NORDICOM.
26. Hanks, A, Just, D & Brumberg, A (2016) Marketing vegetables in elementary school cafeterias to increase uptake. Pediatrics 138, e20151720.
27. Gunnarsdottir, I & Thorsdottir, I (2010) Should we use popular brands to promote healthy eating among children? Public Health Nutr 13, 20642067.
28. Scully, P, Reid, O, Macken, A et al. (2014) Food and beverage cues in UK and Irish children – television programming. Arch Dis Child 99, 979984.
29. Aubrey, JS & Harrison, K (2004) The gender-role content of children’s favorite television programs and its links to their gender-related perceptions. Media Psychol 6, 111146.
30. Smith, SL, Choueiti, M, Prescott, A et al. (2012) Gender Roles and Occupations: A Look at Character Attributes and Job-Related Aspirations in Film and Television. Los Angeles, CA: Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media.
31. Herbozo, S, Tantleff-Dunn, S, Gokee-Larose, J et al. (2004) Beauty and thinness messages in children’s media: a content analysis. Eat Disord 12, 2134.
32. López-Guimera, G, Levine, MP, Sánchez-Carracedo, D et al. (2010) Influence of mass media on body image and eating disordered attitudes and behaviors in females: a review of effects and processes. Media Psychol 13, 387416.
33. Speers, S, Harris, J & Schwartz, M (2011) Child and adolescent exposure to food and beverage brand appearances during prime-time television programming. Am J Prev Med 41, 291296.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed