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Getting the food list ‘right’: an approach for the development of nutrition-relevant food lists for household consumption and expenditure surveys

  • Winnie Bell (a1), Jennifer C Coates (a1), Beatrice L Rogers (a1) and Odilia I Bermudez (a2)

Abstract

Objective

The present paper aimed to demonstrate how 24 h dietary recall data can be used to generate a nutrition-relevant food list for household consumption and expenditure surveys (HCES) using contribution analysis and stepwise regression.

Design

The analysis used data from the 2011/12 Bangladesh Integrated Household Survey (BIHS), which is nationally representative of rural Bangladesh. A total of 325 primary sampling units (PSU=village) were surveyed through a two-stage stratified sampling approach. The household food consumption module used for the analysis consisted of a 24 h open dietary recall in which the female member in charge of preparing and serving food was asked about foods and quantities consumed by the whole household.

Setting

Rural Bangladesh.

Participants

A total of 6500 households.

Results

The original 24 h open dietary recall data in the BIHS were comprised of 288 individual foods that were grouped into ninety-four similar food groups. Contribution analysis and stepwise regression were based on nutrients of public health interest in Bangladesh (energy, protein, fat, Fe, Zn, vitamin A). These steps revealed that a list of fifty-nine food items captures approximately 90 % of the total intake and up to 90 % of the between-person variation for the key nutrients based on the diets of the population.

Conclusions

The study illustrates how 24 h open dietary recall data can be used to generate a country-specific nutrition-relevant food list that could be integrated into an HCES consumption module to enable more accurate and comprehensive household-level food and nutrient analyses.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email winnie.bell@tufts.edu

References

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Getting the food list ‘right’: an approach for the development of nutrition-relevant food lists for household consumption and expenditure surveys

  • Winnie Bell (a1), Jennifer C Coates (a1), Beatrice L Rogers (a1) and Odilia I Bermudez (a2)

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