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Malnutrition and high childhood mortality among the Onge tribe of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands

  • VG Rao (a1), AP Sugunan (a1), MV Murhekar (a1) and SC Sehgal (a1)
Abstract
AbstractObjectives

A study was conducted among the Onge tribe of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands with the objectives of identifying demographic factors responsible for the decline in their population and assessing their nutritional status, which is an important determinant of child survival.

Study design and subjects

The study included estimation of indices of fertility and child mortality, and assessment of nutritional status. All individuals of the Onge community settled on Little Andaman Island were included.

Results

The mean total marital fertility rate was estimated to be 5.15 live births per woman and the general fertility rate was 200 live births per 1000 married-woman-years. Although the gross reproduction rate was estimated to be 2.2 female children per married woman, the net reproduction rate was only 0.9 surviving female child per married woman. The mean infant mortality rate during the past 30 years was 192.7 per 1000 live births, and the child survival rate was found to be only 53.2%. A mild to moderate degree of malnutrition was found in 85% of children of pre-school age and severe malnutrition in 10%. The Onges had low intakes of iron, vitamin A and vitamin C. All the screened Onges were found to be infested with one or more intestinal parasites.

Conclusions

High childhood mortality appears to be the predominant demographic factor responsible for the decline in the Onge population. The high prevalence of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiency disorders could be important factors contributing to the high childhood mortality.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email pblicmr@sancharnet.in
References
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
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