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Social health and nutrition impacts of community kitchens: a systematic review

  • Marina Iacovou (a1), Deanna C Pattieson (a1), Helen Truby (a1) and Claire Palermo (a1)
Abstract
Objective

Community kitchens have been implemented by communities as a public health strategy to prevent food insecurity through reducing social isolation, improving food and cooking skills and empowering participants. The aim of the present paper was to investigate whether community kitchens can improve the social and nutritional health of participants and their families.

Design

A systematic review of the literature was conducted including searches of seven databases with no date limitations.

Setting

Community kitchens internationally.

Subjects

Participants of community kitchens across the world.

Results

Ten studies (eight qualitative studies, one mixed-method study and one cross-sectional study) were selected for inclusion. Evidence synthesis suggested that community kitchens may be an effective strategy to improve participants’ cooking skills, social interactions and nutritional intake. Community kitchens may also play a role in improving participants’ budgeting skills and address some concerns around food insecurity. Long-term solutions are required to address income-related food insecurity.

Conclusions

Community kitchens may improve social interactions and nutritional intake of participants and their families. More rigorous research methods, for both qualitative and quantitative studies, are required to effectively assess the impact of community kitchens on social and nutritional health in order to confidently recommend them as a strategy in evidence-based public health practice.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email claire.palermo@monash.edu
References
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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