Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

A study of nutrition and health claims – a snapshot of what’s on the Irish market

  • Fiona Lalor (a1), Jean Kennedy (a1), Mary AT Flynn (a2) and Patrick G Wall (a1)
Abstract
Objective

To examine the use of nutrition and health claims on packaged foods commonly eaten in Ireland.

Design

An assessment of the labels of packaged food products that are commonly eaten in Ireland to determine the level of use of nutrition and health claims. Where present, the exact text of the claims as observed was recorded for seventeen different food categories and the claims categorised in accordance with EU Regulation 1924/2006 on nutrition and health claims made on foods.

Setting

Four retailers in Dublin, Ireland.

Results

Of the foods surveyed, 47·3 % carried a nutrition claim and 17·8 % carried a health claim. Frozen fruit & vegetables and Breakfast cereals were the food categories with the highest proportion of nutrition claims. The most widespread nutrition claim was that referring to ‘fat’ and, within this group, the most commonly used text was ‘low fat’. The largest category of health claims observed in the present survey was general health claims. Claims referring to the digestive system were the most common followed by claims that a product will ‘lower/reduce/regulate your cholesterol’. Yoghurt & yoghurt drinks was the food category with the highest proportion of health claims, of which improving or boosting the digestive system was the most common.

Conclusions

The use of nutrition and health claims on the Irish market is widespread. EU Regulation 1924/2006 requires monitoring of the market for these types of claims. The current study could provide baseline data for the food industry and regulators to monitor the development of this market in the future.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      A study of nutrition and health claims – a snapshot of what’s on the Irish market
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      A study of nutrition and health claims – a snapshot of what’s on the Irish market
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      A study of nutrition and health claims – a snapshot of what’s on the Irish market
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email Fiona.lalor@ucd.ie
References
Hide All
1. Roe, B, Levy, AS & Derby, BM (1999) The impact of health claims on consumer search and product evaluation outcomes: results from FDA experimental data. J Public Policy Mark 18, 89105.
2. Siró, I, Kapolna, E, Kapolna, B & Lugasi, A (2008) Functional food. Product development, marketing and consumer acceptance – a review. Appetite 51, 456467.
3. Siegrist, M, Stampfli, N & Kastenholtz, H (2008) Consumers’ willingness to buy functional foods. The influence of carrier, benefit and trust. Appetite 51, 526529.
4. Menrad, K (2003) Market and marketing of functional food in Europe. J Food Eng 56, 181188.
5. Lee, Y-K, Georgiou, C & Raab, C (2000) The knowledge, attitudes, and practices of dietitians licensed in Oregon regarding functional foods, nutrient supplements, and herbs as complementary medicine. J Am Diet Assoc 100, 543548.
6. McNally, A (2007) Products offering more than one health claim are more attractive to consumers and this could translate into a 20 percent sales boost, a study in Germany has found. Nutraingredients.com. http://www.nutraingredients.com/news/ng.asp?id=78440-national-starch-health-claims-fibre-prebiotics (accessed December 2008).
7. European Parliament and Council (2006) Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 of the European Parliament and of The Council of 20 December 2006 on nutrition and health claims made on foods. Official Journal of the European Union L404/9–L404/25 (30.12.2006).
8.European Food Safety Authority (2009) Nutrition and Health Claims. Claim applications received by EFSA and the subsequent scientific advice. http://www.efsa.europa.eu/EFSA/ScientificPanels/NDA/efsa_locale-1178620753812_1178684448831.htm (accessed February 2009).
9. European Parliament and Council (2000) Directive 2000/13/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 March 2000 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to the labelling, presentation and advertising of foodstuffs. Official Journal of the European Union L109/29–L109/42 (6.5.2000).
10. Hilliam, M (1998) The market for functional foods. Int Dairy J 8, 349353.
11. World Health Organization (2002) The World Health Report 2002: Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life. Geneva: WHO.
12.Irish Universities Nutrition Alliance (2001) North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey. http://www.iuna.net/index.php/research/northsouth-food-survey (accessed November 2008).
13. Williams, P, Yeatman, H, Ridges, L, Houston, A, Rafferty, J, Ridges, A, Roesler, L, Sobierajski, M & Spratt, B (2006) Nutrient function, health and related claims on packaged Australian food products – prevalence and compliance with regulations. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 15, 1020.
14.Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health (2007) Guidance on the implementation of Regulation No 1924/2006 on nutrition and health claims made on foods. http://ec.europa.eu/food/food/labellingnutrition/claims/guidance_claim_14-12-07.pdf (accessed December 2007).
15. LeGault, L, Brandt, M, McCabe, N, Adler, C, Brown, AM & Brecher, S (2004) 2000–2001 Food label and package survey: an update on prevalence of nutrition labelling and claims on processed, packaged foods. J Am Diet Assoc 104, 952958.
16. Stanton, C, Gardiner, G, Meehan, H, Collins, K, Fitzgerald, G, Lynch, PB & Ross, RP (2001) Market potential for probiotics. Am J Clin Nutr 73, 2 Suppl., 476S483S.
17. Williams, P, Yeatman, H, Zakrzewski, S, Aboozaid, B, Henshaw, S, Ingram, K, Rankine, A, Walcott, S & Ghani, F (2003) Nutrition and related claims used on packaged Australian foods – implications for regulation. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 12, 138150.
18. Sandrou, DK & Arvanitoyannis, IS (2000) Low fat/calorie foods: current state and perspectives. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 40, 427447.
19. Jew, S, Vanstone, C, Antoine, JM & Jones, PJ (2008) Generic and product-specific health claim processes for functional foods across global jurisdictions. J Nutr 138, 1228S1236S.
20.Center for Science in the Public Interest (1998) Functional Foods; Public Health Boon or 21st Century Quackery? http://www.cspinet.org/reports/functional_foods/about.html (accessed August 2009).
21. Bech-Larsen, T & Grunert, KG (2003) The perceived healthiness of functional foods: a conjoint study of Danish, Finnish and American consumers’ perception of functional foods. Appetite 40, 914.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed