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“Police Socialism” in Tsarist Russia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2009

Extract

All national security systems have their methods of keeping track of subversive activity. No doubt a certain number of members of subversive organizations are also police agents, and no doubt a number of police agents are also members of subversive organizations. This is as likely to have been as true of Tsarist Russia as of anywhere else. Certainly the penetration of police agents into the revolutionary movement and of revolutionaries into the secret police was carried to such lengths that in a number of well known cases it was impossible to tell whose interests were being served by certain individuals. In this article I describe four such cases—E. F. Asev, organizer of the assassination of the Russian Minister of the Interior in 1904 and of the Grand Duke Sergius in 1905; Father G. A. Gapon, the priest who led the procession of workers on “Bloody Sunday” in 1905; Bogrov, the assassin of the Russian Prime Minister in 1911; and R. V. Malinovsky, who was leader of the Bolsheviks in the Duma from 1912 until 1914.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © University of Notre Dame 1957

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References

1 Nicolaievsky, Boris, Aseff: the Russian Judas, translated by Reavey, George (London, 1934), pp. 3236.Google Scholar

2 Ibid., pp. 39, 44–45, 49–50.

3 Ibid., pp. 22, 62–64, 67–68, 70, 72, 98.

4 Ibid., pp. 72–91.

5 Ibid., pp. 102–104, 107.

6 Paleologue, Maurice, An Ambassador's Memoirs, translated by Holt, F. A. (New York, 19231925), pp. 157158.Google Scholar

7 Nicolaievsky, , op. cit., pp. 120121.Google Scholar

8 Dillon, Emile John, The Eclipse of Russia (London, 1918), pp. 161163.Google Scholar

9 Krupaskaya, N. K., Memories of Lenin (London, 1942), p. 84.Google Scholar

10 Nicolaievsky, , op. cit., pp. 138145Google Scholar; Krupskaya, , op. cit., p. 87.Google Scholar

11 Pares, Bernard, The Fall of the Russian Monarchy (New York, 1939), p. 124Google Scholar; also note by Guchkov in Gurko, V. I., Features and Figures of the Past (Palo Alto, 1939).Google Scholar

12 The Letters of Tsar Nicholas and Empress Marie, edited by Bing, Edward J. (London, 1937), pp. 265266Google Scholar; SirBuchanan, G. W., My Mission to Russia (London, 1923), Vol. I, p. 155.Google Scholar

13 Badayev, A. E., The Bolsheviks in the Tsarist Duma (London, 1932), pp. 154163.Google Scholar

14 Vassilyev, A. T., The Ochrana (London, 1930), p. 256.Google Scholar

15 Krupskaya, , op. cit., p. 182Google Scholar

16 Wilcox, E. H., Russia's Ruin (New York, 1919), pp. 230231Google Scholar; Kerensky, A. F., The Catastrophe (New York, 1927), p. 220.Google Scholar

17 Wilcox, , op. cit., p. 231.Google Scholar

18 Wilcox, , op. cit., p. 233.Google Scholar

19 Krupskaya, , op. cit., p. 207.Google Scholar

20 Vassilyev, , op. cit., p. 257.Google Scholar

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