Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-jzjqj Total loading time: 0.223 Render date: 2022-08-08T18:46:00.334Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

CONSTRUCTING NATIONAL IDENTITY: ARTS AND LANDED ELITES IN SCOTLAND

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 1999

FRANK BECHHOFER
Affiliation:
Research Centre for Social Sciences, University of Edinbirgh, Old Surgeon's Hall, High School Yards, Edinburgh, EH1 1LS, Scotland
DAVID McCRONE
Affiliation:
Research Centre for Social Sciences, University of Edinbirgh, Old Surgeon's Hall, High School Yards, Edinburgh, EH1 1LS, Scotland
RICHARD KIELY
Affiliation:
Research Centre for Social Sciences, University of Edinbirgh, Old Surgeon's Hall, High School Yards, Edinburgh, EH1 1LS, Scotland
ROBERT STEWART
Affiliation:
Research Centre for Social Sciences, University of Edinbirgh, Old Surgeon's Hall, High School Yards, Edinburgh, EH1 1LS, Scotland
Get access

Abstract

National identities are not essentially fixed or given but depend critically on the claims which people make in different contexts and at different times. The processes of identity rest not simply on the claims made but on how such claims are received, that is validated or rejected by significant others. Because actors are able, up to a point, to anticipate validation or rejection in particular contexts and at particular times, this influences the identity claims that they make. Identity is claimed and read off from various identity markers according to identity rules. Identity rules are the probabilistic rules of thumb whereby under certain structural conditions and in certain contexts, markers are interpreted, combined or given precedence one over another. This paper locates this approach to studies of national identity in the literature, and presents evidence for these assertions from a study of national identity, with examples taken from interviews in Scotland with two elite groups. Those interviewed were for a variety of reasons sensitive to issues of national identity. However, we argue that similar processes are at work generally, albeit people who have less reason to concern themselves with their own identity and the identity of those with whom they interact, see national identity more as something ‘taken-for-granted’, and relatively fixed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1999 BSA Publications Ltd

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

CONSTRUCTING NATIONAL IDENTITY: ARTS AND LANDED ELITES IN SCOTLAND
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

CONSTRUCTING NATIONAL IDENTITY: ARTS AND LANDED ELITES IN SCOTLAND
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

CONSTRUCTING NATIONAL IDENTITY: ARTS AND LANDED ELITES IN SCOTLAND
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *