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Ante-natal Progesterone and Intelligence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Katharina Dalton*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Medicine, University College Hospital, London

Extract

Toxaemia of pregnancy remains the “disease of theories” both in respect of its causation and treatment. Among the many treatments suggested, although not generally accepted, is the administration of progesterone from the middle trimester for the relief of toxaemic symptoms (1, 2 and 3). An unexpected finding has been the clinical observation that children of progesterone-treated mothers appear to reach their milestones earlier and to make excellent progress at school.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1968 

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References

1. Dalton, K. (1954). “Similarity of symptomatology of premenstrual syndrome and toxaemia of pregnancy and their response to progesterone.” Brit. med. J., ii, 1071.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Dalton, K. (1957). “Toxaemia of pregnancy treated with progesterone during the symptomatic stage.” Brit. med. J., ii, 378.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Dalton, K. (1962). “Controlled trials in the prophylactic value of progesterone in the treatment of preeclamptic toxaemia.” J. Obstet. Gynaec. Brit. Cwlth., 69, 465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Reifenstein, E. C. (1958). “Clinical use of 17-α-hydroxy progesterone 17-n-caproate in habitual abortion.” Ann. New York Acad. Sci., 71, 762.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Wilkins, L. (1960). “Masculinization of the female foetus due to the use of orally given progestogens.” J. Amer. med. Ass., 172, 1028.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Ehrhardt, A. A., and Money, J. (1967). “Progestogen-induced hermaphroditism: IQ. and psychosexual identity in a study of ten girls.” J. Sex Res., 3, 1, 83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Gronroos, M., Kivikoski, A., and Rauramo, L. (1961). “A comparative study of the obstetrical history of pupils in schools for backward children and elementary school pupils.” Acta obstet. gynaec. Scand., 40, 321.Google Scholar
8. Barker, D. J. P., and Edwards, J. H. (1967). “Obstetric complications and school performance.” Brit. med. J., ii, 695.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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