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The Association Between Triple X and Psychosis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Wendy J. Woodhouse*
Affiliation:
Bethlem Royal and Maudsley Hospitals, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AZ
Anthony J. Holland
Affiliation:
Bethlem Royal and Maudsley Hospitals, and the Institute of Psychiatry, London
Greg McLean
Affiliation:
South Hants General Hospital, Southampton
Adrianne M. Reveley
Affiliation:
Bethlem Royal and Maudsley Hospitals
*
Correspondence

Abstract

Two cases of psychotic illness in association with the karyotype triple X showed specific diagnostic and management problems as well as obstetric complications, EEG abnormalities, and lack of a family history of psychiatric disorder. Routine karyotyping during the investigation of psychosis is becoming relevant to psychiatric practice as research reports increasingly feature genetic and chromosome anomalies in association with schizophrenic psychoses.

British Journal of Psychiatry (1992), 160, 554–557

Type
Brief Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1992 

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