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Confabulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

N. Berlyne*
Affiliation:
Oldham and District General Hospital, Rochdale Road, Oldham

Extract

Psychiatry suffers from the use of terms widely employed, poorly defined and variously interpreted. Delusion is one such term, but has appropriately commanded a good deal of attention (Hüber, 1955, 1964). Confabulation is another, but has not enjoyed the same critical scrutiny.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1972 

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