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Expressed Emotion and Schizophrenia in North India

III. Influence of Relatives' Expressed Emotion on the Course of Schizophrenia in Chandigarh

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

J. Leff*
Affiliation:
MRC Social Psychiatry Unit
N. N. Wig
Affiliation:
Regional Adviser for Mental Health, WHO Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office, Alexandria, Egypt
D. K. Menon
Affiliation:
Indian Council of Medical Research, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi
H. Bedi
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India, (formerly Social Scientist, Department of Psychiatry, WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health, Chandigarh)
L. Kuipers
Affiliation:
The Maudsley Hospital, London
A. Ghosh
Affiliation:
St David's Hospital, Carmarthen, Wales
H. Bedi
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India, (formerly Social Scientist, Department of Psychiatry, WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health, Chandigarh)
D. K. Menon
Affiliation:
Indian Council of Medical Research, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi
L. Kuipers
Affiliation:
The Maudsley Hospital, London
A. Korten
Affiliation:
Social Psychiatry Research Unit, Australia National University, Canberra
G. Ernberg
Affiliation:
Division of Mental Health, WHO, Geneva
R. Day
Affiliation:
Psychiatric Epidemiology Programme, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
N. Sartorius
Affiliation:
Division of Mental Health, WHO, Geneva
A. Jablensky
Affiliation:
Division of Menial Health, WHO, Geneva
*
MRC Social Psychiatry Unit, Friern Hospital, Friern Barnet Road, London NII

Extract

We conducted a one-year follow-up of patients who had made a first contact with psychiatric services in Chandigarh, North India, and had been assigned a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The expressed emotion (EE) of the patients' relatives was assessed early on. We found the same associations between the individual components of EE and relapse of schizophrenia as in previous Anglo-American studies, but only the association between hostility and relapse was statistically significant. Applying the same criteria as in the Anglo American studies for ‘high EE’, we found a significant relationship between high EE and relapse. This relationship was not explained by other factors often associated with higher relapse rates. We conclude that the significantly better outcome of Chandigarh first-contact patients compared with a London sample is largely due to the significantly lower proportion of high-EE relatives in the North Indian sample.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1987 

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