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A Five to Fifteen Year Follow-Up Study of Infantile Psychosis

II. Social and Behavioural Outcome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Michael Rutter
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychiatry and Maudsley Hospital, London, S.E.5
David Greenfeld
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychiatry
Linda Lockyer
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychiatry, Maudsley Hospital, London, S.E.5; now at Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada

Extract

The two major follow-up studies of children suffering from infantile psychosis, that of Kanner's cases (Kanner, 1943 and 1949; Kanner and Eisenberg, 1955; Eisenberg and Kanner, 1956; Eisenberg, 1956; Kanner and Lesser, 1958) and that of psychotic children seen by Creak (1962, 1963a and b) have shown the generally poor prognosis for these children. In both studies about half the children were in full-time residential care (usually mental sub-normality hospitals) at follow-up, and only 5 per cent. to 17 per cent. could be said to be well adjusted. Similar findings have been reported in the other published studies (reviewed in Rutter, 1966a). Kanner and Eisenberg have described the course of the characteristics of aloneness or autism shown by all or nearly all children with infantile psychosis (Kanner, 1943; Kanner and Eisenberg, 1955; Eisenberg and Kanner, 1956). Although some psychotic children emerge from their solitude to a greater or lesser extent, a lack of social perceptiveness usually remains even in adolescence or early adult life.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1967 

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