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The Quality of Survival after Rupture of an Anterior Cerebral Aneurysm

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Valentine Logue
Affiliation:
The National Hospitals for Nervous Diseases, Queen Square, W.C.I, and Maida Vale, W.9
Marjorie Durward
Affiliation:
Loughborough College of Education, Leicestershire, Maida Vale Hospital, W.9
R. T. C. Pratt
Affiliation:
The National Hospitals for Nervous Diseases, Queen Square, W.C.I, and Maida Vale, W.9
Malcolm Piercy
Affiliation:
Maida Vale Hospital, W.9, and Royal Free Hospital, Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine
W. L. B. Nixon
Affiliation:
University of London, Institute of Computer Science, 44 Gordon Square, W.C.I

Extract

There have been numerous reports on the survival rate after rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, but the actual quality of survival amongst those who recover has been little studied. In this paper the physical, emotional, and intellectual state of a group of 79 survivors from rupture of an anterior cerebral aneurysm is recorded.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1968 

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References

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