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Measurement and psychotherapy: Evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence

  • Frank R. Margison (a1), Michael Barkham (a2), Chris Evans (a3), Graeme McGrath (a1), John Mellor Clark (a2), Kerry Audin (a2) and Janice Connell (a2)...
Abstract
Background

Measurement is the foundation of evidence-based practice. Advances in measurement procedures should extend to psychotherapy practice.

Aims

To review the developments in measurement relevant to psychotherapy.

Method

Domains reviewed are: (a) interventions; (b) case formulation; (c) treatment integrity; (d) performance (including adherence, competence and skilfulness); (e) treatment definitions; (f) therapeutic alliance; and (g) routine outcome measurement.

Results

Modern methods of measurement can support ‘evidence-based practice’ for psychological treatments. They also support ‘practice-based evidence’, a complementary paradigm to improve clinical effectiveness in routine practice via the infrastructure of Practice Research Networks (PRNs).

Conclusions

Advances in measurement derived from psychotherapy research support a model of professional self-management (practice-based evidence) which is widely applicable in psychiatry and medicine.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Frank R. Margison, Gaskell Psychotherapy Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Swinton Grove, Manchester MI3 0EU, UK. E-mail: frmargison@aol.com
Footnotes
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See editorial, pp. 93–94, this issue.

Declaration of interest

The Mental Health Foundation, the Counselling in Primary Care Trust, and the Society for Psychotherapy Research (UK) (Northern Group) have supported the work of the CORE System Group.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
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Measurement and psychotherapy: Evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence

  • Frank R. Margison (a1), Michael Barkham (a2), Chris Evans (a3), Graeme McGrath (a1), John Mellor Clark (a2), Kerry Audin (a2) and Janice Connell (a2)...
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