Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Music therapy for depression: it seems to work, but how?

  • Anna Maratos (a1), Mike J. Crawford (a2) and Simon Procter (a3)
Summary

Evidence is beginning to emerge that music therapy can improve the mental health of people with depression. We examine possible mechanisms of action of this complex intervention and suggest that music therapy partly is effective because active music-making within the therapeutic frame offers the patient opportunities for new aesthetic, physical and relational experiences.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Music therapy for depression: it seems to work, but how?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Music therapy for depression: it seems to work, but how?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Music therapy for depression: it seems to work, but how?
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Anna Maratos, Head of Arts Therapies, CNWL Foundation Trust, c/o 7a Woodfield Road, London W9 2NW. Email: anna.maratos@nhs.net
Footnotes
Hide All

See pp. 132–139, this issue.

Declaration of interest

A.M. and M.J.C. are members of the International Centre for Research in Arts Therapies (ICRA), a non-profit group that aims to promote research in the arts therapies.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1 BBC. The Songs That Saved Your Life. Poll for BBC 6 Music. BBC, 2004 (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/3547347.stm).
2 Erkkilä, J, Punkanen, M, Fachner, J, Ala-Ruona, E, Pöntiö, I, Tervaniemi, M, et al. Individual music therapy for depression: randomised controlled trial. Br J Psychiatry 2011; 199: 132–9.
3 Messer, SB, Wampold, BE. Let's face facts: common factors are more potent than specific therapy ingredients. Clin Psychol Sci Pract 2000; 9: 21–5.
4 Zukowski, EM. The aesthetic experience of the client in psychotherapy. J Humanistic Psychol 1995; 35: 4256.
5 Hagman, G, Press, CM. Between aesthetics, the co-construction of empathy and the clinical. Psychoanal Inq 2010; 30: 207–21.
6 Ansdell, G. Music for Life. Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 1995.
7 Davidson, JW, Good, JMM. Social and musical co-ordination between members of a string quartet: an exploratory study. Psychol Music 2002; 30: 186201.
8 Eliot, TS. The dry salvages. In On the Four Quartets of TS Eliot (ed De Masirevich, C): 48. Barnes and Noble, 1965.
9 Hobson, P. The Cradle of Thought. Exploring the Origins of Thinking. Pan, 2002.
10 Marwick, H, Murray, L. The effects of maternal depression on the ‘musicality’ of infant-directed speech and conversational engagement. In Communicative Musicality: Exploring The Basis of Human Companionship (eds Malloch, S, Trevarthen, C): 281300. Oxford University Press, 2009.
11 Trevarthen, C, Malloch, S. The dance of well-being: defining the music-therapeutic effect'. Nord J Music Ther 2000; 9: 317.
12 Ansdell, G, Pavlicevic, M. Musical companionship, musical community: music therapy and the process and values of musical communication. In Musical Communication (eds Miell, D, MacDonald, R, Hargreaves, DJ): 192213. Oxford University Press, 2005.
13 DeNora, T. Beyond Adorno: Rethinking Music Sociology. Cambridge University Press, 2003.
14 Talwar, N, Crawford, MJ, Maratos, A, Nur, U, McDermott, O, Procter, S. Music therapy for in-patients with schizophrenia. Exploratory randomised controlled trial. Br J Psychiatry 2006; 189: 405–9.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 914 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 3357 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 3rd January 2018 - 24th May 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Music therapy for depression: it seems to work, but how?

  • Anna Maratos (a1), Mike J. Crawford (a2) and Simon Procter (a3)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *