Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-sxzjt Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-20T00:44:12.363Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

The myth of hysteria as illness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Nick Child*
Affiliation:
Child and Family Clinic, 49 Airbles Road, Motherwell ML1 2TJ, Scotland
Rights & Permissions [Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Correspondence
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1989 

References

Bettelheim, B. (1983) Freud and Man's Soul. London: Chatto and Windus, The Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
Child, N. J. (1983a) Patterns of looking and speech in psychiatric interviews: 1. Description. British Journal of Clinical and Social Psychiatry, 2, 4346.Google Scholar
Child, N. J. (1983b) Patterns of looking and speech in psychiatric interviews: 2. Their functions. British Journal of Clinical and Social Psychiatry, 2, 6671.Google Scholar
Szasz, T. S. (1961) The Myth of Mental Illness: Foundations of a Theory of Personal Conduct. New York: Hoeber–Harper. Also London: Paladin (1972).Google Scholar
Taylor, D. C. (1986) Hysteria, play-acting and courage. British Journal of Psychiatry, 149, 3741.Google Scholar
Taylor, D. C. (1982) The components of sickness: diseases, illnesses and predicaments. In One Child (eds Apley, J. and Ounsted, C.), pp. 113. London: Spastics International Medical Publications/Heinemann Medical Books.Google Scholar
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.