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Neuroimaging in psychiatry: bringing neuroscience into clinical practice

  • Mary L. Phillips (a1)
Summary

The past 20 years have seen a remarkable development of neuroimaging methodologies that allow fine-tuned examination of abnormalities in the structure and function of neural circuitry, supporting cognition and emotion in individuals with psychiatric disorders. This editorial highlights the potential of neuroimaging to address major challenges in psychiatric clinical practice.

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References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Neuroimaging in psychiatry: bringing neuroscience into clinical practice

  • Mary L. Phillips (a1)
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