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Predictive validity of acute stress disorder in children and adolescents

  • Tim Dalgleish (a1), Richard Meiser-Stedman (a2), Nancy Kassam-Adams (a3), Anke Ehlers (a2), Flaura Winston (a3), Patrick Smith (a2), Bridget Bryant (a4), Richard A. Mayou (a4) and William Yule (a2)...
Summary

Adult research suggests that the dissociation criterion of acute stress disorder has limited validity in predicting posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We addressed this issue in child and adolescent survivors (n=367) of road accidents. Dissociation accounted for no significant unique variance in later PTSD, over and above other acute stress disorder criteria. Furthermore, thresholds of either three or more re-experiencing symptoms, or six or more re-experiencing/hyperarousal symptoms, were as effective at predicting PTSD as the full acute stress disorder diagnosis.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Tim Dalgleish, Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 2EF, UK. Email: tim.dalgleish@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk
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Declaration of interest

None.

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References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Predictive validity of acute stress disorder in children and adolescents

  • Tim Dalgleish (a1), Richard Meiser-Stedman (a2), Nancy Kassam-Adams (a3), Anke Ehlers (a2), Flaura Winston (a3), Patrick Smith (a2), Bridget Bryant (a4), Richard A. Mayou (a4) and William Yule (a2)...
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